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Beautiful Children

Fourth World Eye Blog

A Country in Spain

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Spain is redefining the modern state in a way that may be instructive for the resolution of instability and violence in failed states. Fictive states like Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, Burma, Lebanon, Zimbabwe, DR Congo, Nigeria, ; and bankrupt or shaky states like Nicaragua, Kenya, and Algeria are populated by many different nations that either contend [&hellip... more →

Sailing the Arctic

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In this map of the Arctic Ocean and the lands surrounding it, Le Monde diplomatique locates energy and mining resources within territories of the Arctic Council, whose participants include Inuit, Athabaskan, Gwich’in, Aleut, Saami, and Russian Indigenous Peoples of the North. Also delineated are sea routes which will come into permanent use within 10-15 years [&hellip... more →

The Children of Biafra Proclaim Independence–Again

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With their principal leader Dr. Ralph Uwazurike imprisoned, ill and purportedly tortured since October 2005 under orders from just replaced President Obsanjo the leaders of the Ibo, Igaw, Ogoni, Igibo and other nations agreed this summer to the establishment of the Republic of Biafra provisional government in exile. In 1967 just a few years after [&hellip... more →

Healthy Humor: Subversive Weapon

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Native American communities have gone through probably the worst of situations in North America that people can go through. North America’s indigenous peoples have experienced the devastating depopulation of their tribes that followed the “discovery of the New World” as American Native Holocaust. To survive mass genocide after the arrival of the Europeans and grapple [&hellip... more →

Self-government, Nations and States

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There has been a revolution in the Fourth World, of sorts, underway for the better portion of the last twenty-five years: Self-governing nations recognized by individual states’ governments and even in the international community. This last Spring the Catalan’s–more than six million strong–claimed and received Spanish governmental recognition of their status as a nation. The [&hellip... more →

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