Beautiful Children

Fourth World Eye

  • How Indigenous Children Learn

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    The independent model of self is best seen in the U.S. mainstream, where context is driven by a set of cultural norms, values and beliefs that center the individual as independent and separate from others. It is a unique cultural model that most of the world does not engage in. In many parts of the… more

  • Co-opting Indigenous NGOs

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    Ford Foundation propaganda at Indian Country Today is meant to co-opt indigenous NGOs in support of Wall Street-funded initiatives. As a supporter of World Bank mega-development on indigenous territories, Ford supports the corporate and state neglect of indigenous human rights. Dependence on Ford and its brokerage International Funders for Indigenous Peoples limits strategy. Learn more… more

  • How many Indigenous People?

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    (Map developed by Decolonial Atlas: Indigenous Peoples as a percentage of the total population by state https://decolonialatlas.wordpress.com/2015/05/21/world-indigenous-population/) Since the year 2000 the number 370 million has been bandied about as the United Nations estimate of the total number of indigenous peoples around the world and this number is grossly incorrect. This is a number established… more

  • Indigenous Knowledge Denied in AZ

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    As might be expected the tangible, educational successes borne from the implementation of indigenous knowledge has again slammed into bigoted, legislative and judicial barriers in a settler state (United States of America). Incredibly The Arizona State legislature enacted and the governor signed a law to effectively bar the state school system from developing and operating… more

  • Indigenous Israelis and Palestinians

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    Locked in a seemingly endless embrace of self-destruction we find the cousin-nations of Palestine and Israel “driven by memory, trauma, and political identity and existential issues” observed Aaron David Miller of the Woodrow Wilson Center. While each of these nations challenges the cultural and political legitimacy of the other serious scholarship informs us that both… more

  • Accountability and Indigenous Nations

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    Who Are the Political Representatives of Indigenous America? As the question of implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples looms on the political horizon; and the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in its wobbly fashion rises for its faint moment in September Indigenous America is just waking to the significance of international… more

  • Essential Fatty Acids and Indigenous Peoples

    I have been asked questions about the Center’s research into the importance of natural sources of essential fatty acids for native peoples. I gave this example to one questioner: United States northwest native metabolism and lipid enzyme pathways for processing a-Linolenic Acid (18:3 omega 3) mirrors the life giving oil requirements of indigenous peoples world-wide.… more

  • Vocabulary of Indigenous Autonomy – Governance

    The words we use to discuss the political future of indigenous nations is changing. A new discussion about indigenous nation governance is moving to the international table: UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. 2014 Discussions about the “situation of indigenous peoples” began at the UN Commission on Human… more

  • Indigenous Nations Engage the World

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    A funny thing happened five years after the UN General Assembly adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples–customary and constitutional indigenous governments decided to begin a new policy of international engagement. They began to do this after more than forty years absence from the international debate about Indigenous Rights begun in the… more

  • Customary & Constitution Indigenous Government

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    Much has been said and written about the parts of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that call for states’ governments to conduct relations with Indigenous peoples within a framework of “free, prior and informed consent.”  The United States Government, after “endorsing” the declaration described the UN Declaration as “aspirational” and then… more

  • Indigenous Nations in Europe

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    A declaration of sovereignty passed by the Catalan parliament on Wednesday has other stateless nations in Europe like Wales watching. With referendums on independence looming in Scotland and Basque Country, indigenous nations in Europe are actively challenging EU member states to abide by the principles of self-determination declared by the UN General Assembly in 2007. more

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  • Deforestation & Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

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    SBSTA Session Bonn, Germany – Indigenous Peoples’ concerns on Deforestation The International Indigenous Peoples’ forum on Climate Change (IIPFCC) is meeting in Bonn, Germany during the current intergovernmental session where the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and technological Advice (SBSTA) ** is convened to consider proposals and recommendations for explaining the factors that promote and drive… more

  • Indigenous Campesino Movements

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    In a recent YES! Magazine article entitled Beyond “Free” or “Fair” Trade: Mexican Farmers Go Local, Mike Wold highlights the devastating effects that NAFTA has had on indigenous campesinos (farmers) in Mexico and the creative agricultural and entrepreneurial responses they are choosing to assert.  By deconstructing the dichotomy between Free and Fair Trade, the article… more

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  • Indigenous Nations of the World

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    In his article in Indian Country Today, Duane Champagne discusses the continuity and persistence of indigenous cultures and commitments to their own political forms. Recounting the evolution of nation states since the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, Champagne suggests the political complexity of the world, like diverse cultures and languages, should be embraced rather than… more

  • World Bank Accountable to Indigenous Peoples

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    The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) was founded in 1944 to rebuild Japan and Germany after World War II. Once successful the IBRD found a new mission: “To fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results. To help people help themselves and their environment by providing resources, sharing knowledge, building capacity and… more

  • UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

    The UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNEMRIP) issued its “Final report of the study on indigenous peoples and the right to participate in decision-making”. The Report, which addresses good practices at different levels, has been submitted to the Human Rights Council. The UNEMRIP was established by the Human rights Council in… more

  • Indigenous Energy Summit

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    June 27-29 in Niagara Falls, Ontario, the Assembly of First Nations will host the International Indigenous Summit on Energy and Mining. Emphasizing the link between sustainability, sovereignty, and solidarity, AFN National Chief Shawn Atleo observes that First Nations worldwide need to work together for responsible industry that respects their rights under international law. The National… more

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  • The “Right” in “Indigenous Rights”

    Since the Fall of 2007 many have celebrated the UN General Assembly’s decision to endorse the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The governments of fifteen states either abstained or openly rejected the Declaration. China, the Russian Federation and the United States of America–three of the original UN organizing powers–chose to reject either by… more

  • Applying Indigenous Knowledge

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    Bolivia’s Foreign Minister since 2006, David Choquehuanca is a leading voice in favor of promoting traditional knowledge and its parallel application to climate change mitigation and adaptation approaches.  Foreign Minister Choquehuanca is Aymara born near Lake Titicaca in 1961.  He holds a graduate degree in History and Anthropology based on his dissertation, “Rights of Indigenous… more

  • Neutralizing Indigenous Sovereignty

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    As Rick Harp, editor of Media Indigena, notes, one way of neutralizing indigenous sovereignty is by undermining indigenous institutions. In the old days, that took the form of outlawing their councils, languages, economies, gatherings, and protector societies; today that takes the form of federal interventions that usurp indigenous governance all together. Laying the ideological groundwork… more

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  • World Indigenous Peoples’ Conference – 2014

    During the last forty years since the UN Commission on Human Rights designated José Martinez Cobo as the Special Rapporteur responsible for conducting the “Study of the Problem of Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations,” and the nearly thirty years since the establishment of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations a small collection of cultural mediators… more

  • US Swings “Right”: Indigenous Peoples’ Warning

    The US government has been generally hostile to indigenous peoples for most of the last 45 years in the international arena.  Their concern? “Indigenous peoples may want to invoke political self-determination and split their territory off from the US or other existing states.” Evidence of US hostility is born out by succeeding administrations opposing the… more

  • Indigenous knowledge and value

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    Western knowledge is a commodity that is sold only to those who can afford access. Young people today look at the internet and think, of course knowledge is free! Look at the web! But knowledge of any sizable integrity costs. This is true in all societies in one sense. If you seek knowledge from the… more

  • Canada Obstructing Indigenous Peoples – CBD

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    During the long years when indigenous peoples spent their very limited resources to travel to Geneva, Switzerland to help formulate language for the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) the Government of Canada joined by Australia, New Zealand and the United States did everything imaginable to block language that would provide justice… more

  • Indigenous Doctors Congress 2010

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    Indigenous doctors from throughout the Pacific are currently meeting during the Pacific Region Indigenous Doctors Congress (PRIDoC) at Whistler, Canada home to the Squamish and Lil’wat First Nations. Born from the vision of a forum for mutual support and for the sharing of resources and expertise delegates are coming together to learn and teach one… more

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  • Indigenous Nations Must Ratify Genocide Conventions!

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    August 1999 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. The Croatian ex-militia man’s confession to acts of torture committed against Serbians in the carnage left after the collapse of Yugoslavia demands our full attention and the vigorous action of indigenous nation’s governments. Former Croatian militiaman and former civilian police officer, Miro Bajaramovic, speaking in an interview with… more

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  • Indigenous Leaders Forum Meets In Seattle During World Trade Organization Meetings – Challenges Civil Society

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    February 2000 by Rodney Bobiwash From November 29-December 03, 1999 the attention of the world focused on Seattle and the meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This normally secretive assortment of drab fiscal bureaucrats and negotiators were thrust into the forum of public opinion amidst a backdrop of massive street demonstrations and dramatic footage… more

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  • Who Speaks for Indigenous People?

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    February 2001 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. An Indigenous Peoples’ Forum at the UN and Bureaucrats in every State Capitol The United Nations announced in November that it would establish a fifteen member Indigenous Peoples’ Forum that reports to the UN Economic and Social Council. Next to the UN Security Council and the UN General… more

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  • Indigenous Statement

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    Global Indigenous Peoples Caucus comments on UNDRIP progress via the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples at the UN Human Rights Commission. more

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  • Tales from Indigenous Europe

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    “When our generation is gone, none of this is known anymore,” said Prof. Maria Mies during a talk in Cologne yesterday in front of an audience (the mentees, organizer and friends of the university’s Cornelia Harte Mentoring program) which was impressed by Ms Mies life’s experience and knowledgeable insights. “There are words in our local… more

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  • UN Indigenous Discourse A Disappointment

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    I sat in the General Assembly Hall of the United Nations at the 9th Session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues last week listening to speakers from North American Indigenous organizations, and the US and Canada governments, and I was dismayed at what I heard. I heard Fred Caron begin the meeting by describing… more

  • Rights of Indigenous Peoples

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    The extension of citizenship rights to peoples that have been dispossessed and subsumed by the very States that are granting these rights is simply a form of internal colonialism. Indeed, citizenship is often associated with nation building and state legitimacy and, in fact, makes no sense outside of the framework of the nation-state. Human rights… more

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  • US New Enemy: Indigenous Peoples

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    The US Supreme Court heard arguments today reported by the news media as an issue of US Constitutional First Amendment Rights. The Courts decision will have much larger implications if it decides in favor the US Justice Departments arguments that seek to enforce the US Government’s Patriot Act (hastily enacted by the US Congress after… more

  • Anti-Indigenous Development

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    Consistent with the exclusion of indigenous peoples from UN talks on climate change, Canada and the other Arctic states plan to keep indigenous nations out of their upcoming summit on Arctic development. more

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  • Indigenous Report

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    State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, a new report by the UN, notes that the extreme poverty of indigenous peoples on all continents is directly related to their loss of lands, often taken illegally by private interests backed by state authorities. In places like Colombia and Peru, says the report, those authorities augment official violence… more

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  • Monoplists, Public Policy and Indigenous Rights

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    The World Trade Organization is essentially the world’s “chamber of commerce” sanctioned by states’ governments to regulate public policy. It is now quite commonly accepted in the assemblies of government that when public policies (health, education, economic, human rights, indigenous rights, etc) prevent profit or reduce profits for a corporation (read trans-state corporation) the policy… more

  • Indigenous Exclusion

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    Under international law, 80% of biodiversity on planet Earth is the property of indigenous peoples. Their governments, their efforts, and their exclusion by the UN and its member states are not mentioned in mainstream media. Given the deceitful efforts of the United States government — as well as UN officials — to block participation by… more

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  • The light footprint of indigenous west Mexico

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    Imagine if you will ships toweringly loaded with oyster shells and vessels traveling the Pacific Ocean carrying textiles, wood, ceramics and copper and tin and you might think such sights not unusual at all. But, imagine that these ships are made of balsa wood and the oysters are a variety of pink, red and white… more

  • Indigenous World 2009

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    In the comprehensive report Indigenous World 2009, the evolving set of relations between indigenous nations and modern states is examined in detail. Within the new context of international human rights instruments developed for this purpose, the majority of states continue to pursue a policy of assimilation or other forms of annihilation of indigenous cultures. Included… more

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  • Anti-Indigenous Axis

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    The crackdown on Uyghurs in China, like the systematic brutality of Israel toward Palestinians, betrays the promise of universal human rights adopted by the United Nations in 1948. More recently, subsuming freedom to power betrays the extension of human rights to indigenous peoples by the UN in 2007. While international law is on their side,… more

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  • Indigenous Governance

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    Self Defense The million plus indigenous peoples of Colombia plan to establish a 100,000-member pan-tribal police force to protect indigenous communities from armed violence by the army, vigilantes, guerrillas and drug-dealers. more

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  • Indigenous Film Festival

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    Indigenous Peoples Film Festival to be screened in Valparaiso, Chile. Intended to give voice to indigenous filmmakers, the festival hopes to counter racist state propaganda used to marginalize indigenous communities and to justify murder of indigenous activists throughout the world. more

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  • BINGOs, wars and Indigenous Refugees

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    Big International NGOs (BINGOs) like the Worldwide Fund for Nature, Conservation International and the Nature Conservancy directly cause the displacement of Fourth World peoples from their territories resulting in large numbers of native peoples living as refugees.  Former Publisher and Editor of the magazine Mother Jones Mark Dowie writes in his new book Conservation Refugees… more

  • Indigenous Solidarity in Latin America

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    It is beautiful to see solidarity happen. Indigenous peoples throughout Latin America most of who have experienced similar exploitative endeavors by their national governments are supportive of the indigenous peoples’ fight for their ecosystems against exploitation by energy companies in the Peruvian Amazon. Despite aggressive advertisement campaigns by energy companies and the Peruvian government which… more

  • Indigenous Summit

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    Anchorage Declaration On April 24, the Indigenous Peoples’ Global Summit on Climate Change issued the Anchorage Declaration. The declaration will guide successive talks between aboriginal nations and the United Nations, notably in the forthcoming negotiations at the December conference in Copenhagen. Key to the evolving relationship between UN member states and stateless nations comprising the… more

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  • Indigenous Education

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    Spirit of Learning The World Indigenous Peoples’ Conference on Education held last month in Melbourne was a big success. The 2011 conference will be hosted by the Quechua Nation of Peru. more

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  • The Indigenous Message

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    Environmental Ethics Tomorrow, in Poznan, Poland, Tom Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network will address the UN climate talks on behalf of the Indigenous Caucus, gathered there to shed light on the failure of the UN and its member states. Last Spring, Mr. Goldtooth spoke in New York about bringing the indigenous message to the… more

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  • Indigenous Delegates Meet Bolivia in Poland

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    Poznan, Poland 8 December 2008 — Representatives of Indigenous Peoples’ organizations and President Fawn Sharp of the Quinault Indian Nation meeting as the Indigenous Peoples’ Caucus met this morning with the Bolivian Government’s Vice Minister for the Environment calling on President Evo Morales to “be the voice of the voiceless” at the Conference of Parties… more

  • Indigenous Values

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    Inherent Moral Authority UN climate change conferences could benefit from indigenous participation, but their traditional knowledge comes with a price, and that price is respect. And respect of indigenous values, while given lip service by modern states, is not an area the UN or its member states want to get into while discussing adaptation to… more

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  • Indigenous Solidarity

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    Indigenous nations and associations of South and Central America express solidarity with Bolivia’s president Evo Morales, threatening widespread action against the U.S. empire if the United States government doesn’t cease its efforts to overthrow the governments of Bolivia and Venezuela. more

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  • The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Tibet

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    The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Affirms that Tibetan peoples are equal to all other peoples, while recognizing the right of all peoples to be different, to consider themselves different, and to be respected as such, Affirms also that Tibetan peoples contribute to the diversity and richness of civilizations and cultures, which… more

  • Indigenous Fellowship Programme

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    English-Speaking Indigenous Fellowship Programme 2008   Five English-speaking indigenous fellows will visit UNESCO headquarters for a two-week stay (9-20 June 2008), with the aim to learn about the work of the organization and engage in dialogue on issues of mutual concern.   As well as taking part in group sessions on UNESCO’s activities, the fellows… more

  • Protecting Indigenous Property

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    In this briefing memorandum, indigenous scholars discuss intellectual property rights as perceived by indigenous nations. Noting the right to collective ownership as an essential element of indigenous culture, the authors clarify the fundamental difference in cultural perspectives that presently plagues relations between corporations, states and indigenous peoples. Protecting indigenous property, as they observe, requires developing… more

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  • World Indigenous Movement

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    World Indigenous Movement Background The world-wide war conducted by modern states, religions, and markets against indigenous peoples never ended; it just took new forms. State-centric and market-oriented international institutions presently pose a major threat to the survival of the world’s first nations. The World Indigenous Movement is now fighting the final battles to protect their… more

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  • Anti-Indigenous Development

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    Reminiscent of the twentieth century displacement and subsequent impoverishment of Columbia River tribes by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the indigenous people of the Amazon River now face extinction of their way of life at the hands of the Brazilian National Electric Company. Real News TV reports from Altamira. more

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  • Discovering Indigenous Europe

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    Famous Roman myths and legends are considered true reality, historic facts in Europe. On the Palatine Hill, the centermost of the Seven Hills of Rome, Italy, archaeologists have discovered one of the most sacred mythological places of Western Civilization: The holy cave. There, as legend has it, Romulus and Remus the two founders of the… more

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  • Indigenous reality behind climate change

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    Experts agree, climate change may be the greatest threat facing our planet. No doubt, for all of human kind climate change is a threat to biodiversity, and involves a number of potential challenges for public health. To indigenous peoples climate change is equivalent to environmental and cultural genocide. Environmental issues are not just about the… more

  • Indigenous Identity

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    As an American, I think indigenous identity is something diasporaed Europeans are still getting a handle on, and it seems to help to communicate with our still-rooted relations on the peninsula and islands even if we haven’t managed to travel there in person. Having had the good fortune to do so, though, I find it… more

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  • Made in Israel

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    As Gabriel Schivone reports, Israel’s role in Guatemala’s colossal massacres of Mayan Indians in the 1980s was as an intermediary for the United States. Indigenous refugees from atrocities in Central America — that continue to this day — now encounter Israeli-made surveillance towers on the US-Mexico border, where US forces occupy the second largest Native American reservation of Tohono… more

  • Israel’s Occupation not Legal: UN Security Council

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    The United Nations Security Council voted 14-0 in favor of a resolution citing Israel’s occupation of Palestinian lands as having “no legal validity.” The resolution was originally offered by Egypt and then four states (New Zealand, Malaysia, Senegal and Venezuela) asked that the Security Council vote. The resolution essentially states that Israel’s 50 year occupation… more

  • China’s Eyes & Ears on Uyghurs

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    UYGHURSTAN IS UNDER THE WATCHFUL EYES AND EARS of Beijing with 200,000 military, 24-hour patrols and police depots keeping watch on “telephone recharging states, WiFi, umbrellas, wheelchairs and hot tea” to control the Uyghur population. The People’s Republic of China is now implementing George Orwell’s “1984” in the capital of Urumqi, towns, villages and communities of… more

  • The Chicago School

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    In Let Us Now Praise Wealthy Men?: Structural Poverty, Religiously (Re)Considered, Peter Laarman interviews Joerg Rieger, a leading theological thinker in relation to economic justice. As Rieger notes, wealth is about power, and the goal of the culture we have created is to please them and to follow their wishes. This servility and deference to… more

  • Twenty-five Tribal Members earn CWIS-CTM Certificates in Herbal Medicines

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    Twenty-five Tulalip, Muckleshoot and Colville Tribal members earned Center for Traditional Medicine Herbal Medicines Certificates after nine-months of intensive studies under the instruction of Valerie Segrest from the Muckleshoot Tribe. Ten members of the Tulalip Tribes in Washington State, USA were awarded the Center for World Indigenous Studies Center for Traditional Medicine Herbal Medicines Certificate.… more

  • The Beautiful People

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    Like his accomplice Naomi Klein, Tom Goldtooth was once a principled and articulate spokesman in opposition to Wall Street, until he was seduced by the dark money flowing from the oil industry into the non-profit industrial complex. Now, like Klein, he is a caricature of his former self, hobnobbing with the elite of the NGO… more

  • A Clear Agenda

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    As Cory Morningstar and Forrest Palmer report, the corporations that fund the non-profit industrial complex through tax-exempt foundations have a clear agenda, even though that agenda is obscured by the much-hyped show business of the so-called ‘activists’ on their payroll. For corporations like Unilever–owner of Ben & Jerry’s, as well as the “Fair and Lovely”… more

  • Trumplicans and Kleptocracy: The new Challenge

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    Kleptocracy is defined as a form of government by those who seek chiefly status and personal gain at the expense of the governed. Frequently kleptocracies are ruled by corporate business leaders or directly by corporate businesses. After 35 years of what seemed like a growing consensus among UN Member States that indigenous peoples’ rights should be… more

  • UN FW Observer Nations?

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    Fourth World Nations can become observer nations at the UN if Member states fulfill their commitments made at the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in 2014! The September 2014 United Nations World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (WCIP) produced a consensus Outcome document that mandated, among other things, the Secretary General to “concrete proposals to enable participation… more

  • Grinding Grist

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    In case you were wondering why Grist magazine, based in Seattle, is pro-GMO and pro-Nukes (as is Bill Gates), following the money is probably a good place to start. Funders of Grist include Tides Foundation (an oil industry money laundry), Ford Foundation (a partner of the World Bank in ethnic cleansing of Indigenous peoples worldwide),… more

  • Straight Talk Hate Talk

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    When it comes to professional conduct, attorneys, physicians and elected officials are subject to review by their peers through private associations and public commissions. They can face disbarment, censure, loss of licenses to practice, as well as removal from office through recall and impeachment. For the public relations industry, however, no such oversight exists. While… more

  • US vs Bolivia

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    Under Bolivia’s first indigenous president, the indigenous majority, plurinational state of Bolivia has made dramatic improvements in health, education and economic opportunity for its citizens. For a previously feudal society, where a few Spanish-descendant families basically owned the country, the socialist revolution has cut extreme poverty in half, nearly doubled the minimum salary, and tripled… more

  • Amelia Marchand, Associate Scholar

    MS. skʷumqnálqs AMELIA A.M. MARCHAND of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation has been appointed as a member of the Center for World Indigenous Studies Associate Scholars Program.   Holding a Masters Degree in Environmental Law & Policy at the Vermont Law School. She has extensive experience and background in the fields of Environmental… more

  • The Holy Spirit

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    While (at age 63) I am now a deist, I was raised Lutheran, until (in my adolescence) I began my quest for freedom from institutionalized religion–seeking a more personally meaningful spiritual identity. As a child living next door to a Yakama Indian family, I was vaguely aware of other points of view regarding the Holy… more

  • Transformation

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    Professor Taiaiake Alfred of the University of Victoria program of Indigenous Governance discusses Research as Indigenous Resurgence. In the era of co-optation through colonial assimilating processes like recognition and reconciliation, indigenous resurgence through reestablishing connections to land, community and culture helps to rebuild the indigenous ethic of leadership. Becoming rooted and accountable, says Alfred, is… more

  • New World Order

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    In terms of relevance to the indigenous nations often referred to as the Fourth World, the rollouts from the COP21 gathering of UN member states, Wall Street-funded NGOs, and the global financial elite resemble colonial initiatives undertaken as a result of similar 19th Century gatherings to carve up the world for capitalism. Then, as now,… more

  • Climate Agreement Failure

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    After reading the final treaty agreement from the Climate Change conference in Paris published on Saturday 12  December 2015 I have to say that the efforts of the adhoc International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change (IIPFCC) (in which I have played a part from time to time over the years) have proved unsuccessful. The… more

  • Free, Prior and Informed Consent

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    US Government Proposes to Weaken Informed Consent Three section of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) state that indigenous peoples–indigenous nations–have a legitimate expectation that no legislative, administrative or juridicial action, policy or practice may be carried out by a state or its subdivisions without first obtaining their free, prior… more

  • Preventing Discursive Monoculture

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    Sometimes I think IC Magazine readers fail to understand what is at stake in providing an Indigenous News Fund that would allow IC to remain independent from the aristocratic derivatives that have polluted the infosphere over the last decade. The transfer of wealth from public to private spheres in this century has ushered in an… more

  • Nations in the Nuclear Cloud

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    Seventy years after the first nuclear bomb detonation in 1945 as of July 2015 indigenous peoples’ territories and peoples remain at greatest health and environmental risk to radioactive and toxic chemical exposure of any peoples in the world.  Fourth World nations’ territories and peoples in Siberia, Kazakhstan and Kirgystan, Marshall Islands and Polynesia, Australia, northwestern… more

  • Anti-Indian Reader

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    Anti-Indian Campaign articles by Jay Taber and John Schertow at IC Magazine Anti-Indian CERA by Terri Hansen, Indian Country Today Media Network Anti-Indian Movement on the Tribal Frontier by Rudolph C. Ryser, Center for World Indigenous Studies Anti-Indian Movement articles by Charles Tanner Jr., Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights Drumming Up Resentment… more

  • FW Americans Killed Legally

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    The heavily militarized police departments across the United States are taking a terrible toll on the lives of mostly unarmed people of color–both men and women. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Health Statistics give weight to this assertion that shows not only African Americans age 20-24 are most… more

  • Deceptive UN Propaganda

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    Sustainable Development Goals propaganda is the obvious motive for the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples op-ed at Indian Country Today. After her ritual listing of all the corporate state woes that indigenous peoples face around the world, Special Rapporteur Victoria Tauli-Corpuz advocates embracing the corporate state solution of Sustainable Development Goals.… more

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  • Forced FW Assimilation-Russia

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    The Russian Federation along with Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burundi, Georgia, Kenya, Nigeria, and Ukraine abstained from voting for or against the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. Shortly after the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples releasing its Outcome Statement declaring an action plan to implement the UNDRIP, the Russian government issued… more

  • FW Slavery?

    The third largest criminal activity in the world is human trafficking or bluntly, modern slavery.Twenty-two million to Thirty-eight million people in the world are victims of slavery–involuntary servitude. The Indian and Pakistan are two states where literally more than a million people in each country are victims. Russia, Angola, and the Congo are among other… more

  • Gilio-Whitaker at NAISA

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    Gilio-Whitaker CWIS Research Associate and Associate Scholar Dina Gilio-Whitaker will present a major paper at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association 2015 session in Washington, D.C. June 4th. Gilio-Whitaker will present a paper entitled Fourth World Theory as Methodology as a member of the Indigenous Pedagogies panel chaired by Laura Weaver from the University… more

  • Human Rights Deniers

    Fourth World nations’ desire to use international human rights laws to protect their interests and prevent depredations on their culture, land, and way of life has come at a time when UN member states are abandoning Human Rights laws. With the reelection of David Cameron as the UK prime ministership and the sweeping election of… more

  • UN FW Agenda 2015 forward

    [English and Spanish Text] The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) concluded its 14th Meeting on 1 May by issuing a series of new recommendations for action by the UN Economic and Social Council (EcoSoc) – the parent body of the UNPFII. These items may well cause Fourth World nations the world over… more

  • Just Say No to 350

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    When 350 targeted Bolivia and The Peoples Agreement on Climate Change for subversion in 2010, it was an act of aggression with roots in the 2009 attempted coup — funded by the U.S. State Department — in reaction to the 2008 constitutional revolution of Bolivia’s indigenous peoples. The inspiration for the indigenous uprising, that saw… more

  • Apartheid Australia

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    John Pilger reports on the current ethnic cleansing policy of the Government of Australia, aimed at dispossessing the remaining Aboriginal homelands on behalf of industry. Massive cuts to indigenous housing, health, legal aid and social programs reflect the view of the Australian prime minister that, “It’s not the job of taxpayers to subsidize lifestyle choices.”… more

  • Crimes Against Humanity

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    As Cory Morningstar reported in 350: Agent Saboteur, the April 2010 World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth, held in Cochabamba, Bolivia, was the first and only climate conference that was led by indigenous peoples and recognized by the United Nations. The People’s Agreement — that resulted from this conference… more

  • Warring & Covenant Nations

    More than thirty years ago I wrote an article entitled: Fourth World Wars, A New International Political Order. In that piece I described more than 128 “cold,” “warm” and “hot” wars between Fourth World nations and many different states. One of the longest of these wars still underway involves the Burmese government against the Karen… more

  • Sovereignty and Treaty Protection

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    For indigenous peoples, protecting themselves from attack has to be done simultaneous with developing self-determination infrastructure. One area they must pay attention to is the role of religious bigotry and organized racism, especially in mainstream media and NGOs devoted to terminating indigenous nations. A microcosm of this indigenous challenge can be found in the Wall… more

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  • How a State Becomes a Nation-State

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    In Fourth Word Theory we make distinctions between nations, states, and nation-states, in contradistinction to mainstream international relations theory. IRT takes as a given that all three terms are interchangeable and mean the same thing. FWT, on the other hand, recognizes the historical existence of nations indigenous to place whose political existence through colonial processes… more

  • Ending FW Wars: A Proposal

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    My colleague Heidi Bruce writes in “Paved with Bad Intentions” a piece recounting the Ñatho (Otomî) efforts to stop construction of the Toluca-Naucalpan Super Highway by the Mexican government, “lasting change that honors the government-to-government relationship Indigenous nations deserve to have with states’ governments, will only come when states and nations sit at the same… more

  • UNDRIP Protocol?

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    Last year the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) authorized a study into the possibility of the UN drafting an ‘Optional Protocol” that could be adopted by states’ government members as a method for monitoring implementation of the UNDRIP; and to provide for a mechanism to receive claims by indigenous peoples against states governments… more

  • Asian Fourth World Battles Against Corporate Exploitation

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    The Asian Indigenous Peoples Pact , formed in 1988, “is a regional organization founded in 1988 by indigenous peoples’ movements. AIPP is committed to the cause of promoting and defending indigenous peoples’ rights and human rights and articulating issues of relevance to indigenous peoples. At present, AIPP has 47 members from 14 countries in Asia… more

  • FW Journalistic Collaboration

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                           CWIS and Intercontinental Cry Magazine form journalistic alliance DATE:29 December 2014    The Center for World Indigenous Studies Board of Directors approved a collaboration agreement with Intercontinental Cry Magazine (intercontinentalcry.org) to work for the ten-year old magazine’s “editorial and commercial success.” After two months of negotiations, CWIS Board Chair Rudolph Ryser and Intercontinental Cry… more

  • CWIS Global Reach

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    The Center for World Indigenous Studies celebrates its 36th year since its founding in 1979 ready to meet the ground-up challenges presented by a greatly more immediate world. Radio, Television, Internet, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and the whole lot make the world more accessible. But, the very existence of so many corporate and personal mechanism for… more

  • Treaties & New Agenda

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    “Trail of Broken Treaties:” For Renewal of Contracts — Reconstruction of Indian Communities & Securing an Indian Future in America   Forty-two years ago October 31 the “Trail of Broken Treaties 20-Point Position Paper” was issued by the American Indian Movement (AIM) to the news media. When it was released it was considered to be… more

  • Irradiating FW peoples!

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    Electromagnetic Warfare Training facilities: US Navy Plan 2014 Construction of electromagnetic warfare facilities, nuclear testing and production sites and other radiation producing projects have been constructed in rural, low population areas such as on and near indigenous peoples’ territories throughout the world. The US Navy is planning a new facility that will directly affect the… more

  • Viva Catalonia

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    Catalonia is one of my most favorite Fourth World nations. It is has been occupied by the Phonecians, Greeks, Romans, and the emergent kingdom of Spain over the last three thousand years or so and still it persists. Salvador Dalí years ago stepped out into a crowd in Barcelona and before camera’s flashing and with… more

  • Gates vs. Democracy

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    Gates Foundation, founded on proceeds from Microsoft, is understandably oriented toward pursuing privatization worldwide. It is, after all, what made Gates wealthy and influential. Privatization of global agriculture, like health and education, is a major project of Gates Foundation. Partnered with other corporations like Monsanto, Microsoft uses the monopoly model to eliminate competition, as well… more

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  • Tlingit & Haida & WCIP

    Vice President Micklin is responsible to his government and the 29,000 members of Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. In intergovernmental forums such as the United Nations and inter-tribal bodies such as the National Congress of American Indians one’s accountability counts. Those of us, who head non-governmental organizations, sit as academics, or who study… more

  • Bush Medicine and Ebola

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    Bush medicine, traditional medicine, spirit dancing, and countless other healing systems distinguish one people from another–one culture from another. The immense diversity of healing systems reflects the many cultural realities of the worlds thousands of distinct nations. State and international policy tend to standardize health systems at the expense of ancient and enduring approaches to… more

  • Land Reform in Vanuatu

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    In Vanuatu, in the South Pacific’s Melanesia, land ownership is based on a traditional land tenure system. 80% of the land is held by extended families, but land laws and corrupt politics have favored international interests, making Vanuatu a tax haven and investment opportunity for the tourist industry. The result has been that 56% of… more

  • Oh Gosh Canada: Blocking Food?

    In this space I called attention to the government of Canada and its objection to the World Council of Indigenous Peoples Outcome Document. That document would commit UN Member states to secure the free, prior and informed consent of indigenous nations BEFORE enacting or approving administrative acts, legislation, judicial decisions or policies that have an… more

  • Oh Canada: The Fraudulent State

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    The Canadian government presents itself to the world as the leading advocate of human rights, promoter of democracy–the country with a heart. Hidden behind this facade is a mean spirited, greedy, criminal organization dedicated to personal wealth, and the destruction of indigenous peoples.  Harsh! I hear you say. Well, after more than forty years working… more

  • WCIP Outcome Summarized

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    After four years planning and much commotion surrounding the process, the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples is now a page in history. It has been hailed as everything from insulting to a significant milestone for indigenous peoples. Opinions on the outcome of the conference will no doubt vary as time goes on, as it does… more

  • UN Adopts WCIP Outcome

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    With the Holy See and Canada opting out of Article 13 and Article 3 (respectively) the UN High Level Plenary Session of the General Assembly today adopted the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples Outcome Document (Resolution A/69.L.1).                           With about 200 indigenous peoples’… more

  • Nations’ Independence – Taxation

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    Commentators and essayists throughout generations have often made the observation that( (I paraphrase here): States’ governments do not give up their power easily and the power they are least willing to give up is taxation.” The “No Vote” opposing Scotland’s independence yesterday confirms that when the leaders of Britain’s political parties joined in a common… more

  • WCIP Agenda Announced

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    Haudenosaunee Sachems, the Sami President, President of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples, representatives of each of the seven regions of Indigenous Regional Caucuses will stand a opening conference presenters and as “roundtable” participants with states’ government representatives during a day long session of the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples on 22 September at… more

  • Scottish Independence more than Economics

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    The New York Times published this article today, in which the author Neil Erwin characterizes Scotland’s bid for independence as a problem created by Britain’s elites. Britain’s current conservative government, he seems to be saying, doesn’t comport well with Scotland’s tendency toward more of a social welfare state. He blames the near collapse of England’s… more

  • Climate is Right

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    In the early 1970s the publics in virtually every country in the world began demanding that their governments act to protect and preserve the environment: Land, water, sea, soils, natural plants and animals and people). The result in most countries was the establishment of government agencies, businesses, and social movements aimed at just those goals.… more

  • Politics? Self-Government

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    CWIS drafted the Joint Statement of Constitutional and Customary Indigenous Governments that received the endorsement of eleven Fourth World governments in Africa, South and North America and Southeast Asia. The purpose of the Joint Statement was to respond to the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues agenda in May of 2014. The topic was “indigenous… more

  • Wall Street’s Indians

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    With so much focus on the BINGOs and RINGOs promoting the climate week hoopla, their counterparts that comprise the indigenous wing of the non-profit industrial complex sometimes get overlooked. While not nearly as well-funded, foundation brokerages and money laundries that co-opt and corrupt indigenous activism — similar to the function played by TIDES for the… more

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  • RINGOs BINGOs Klein & Company

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    One week out from the climate week chaos, the anticipation of something historic — once again — generates a lot of noise, but not much learning. Learning will come later, after the groupie chatter and celebrity banalities subside. Like the Academy Awards, after the glitter and glamour of trite starlets like Naomi Klein begins to… more

  • Poverty Pimping

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    Anyone who has observed politicians and developers in action knows that the quickest way to destroy community cohesion is through programs like the war on poverty. As it and other myriad schemes by governments to use the plight of the poor to enrich themselves, the cover of moral sanctity is essential to success. On the… more

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  • False Hope

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    The globalization of poverty through privatization initiatives and austerity measures — enforced by the IMF and World Bank on behalf of Wall Street — would never have been possible were it not for the psychological warfare waged against public consciousness over the last three decades. As concepts, humanitarian warfare, indigenous capitalism, and free market environmentalism… more

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  • Climate Charade

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    The People’s Climate March, a charade orchestrated by Avaaz and 350 — organizations funded by Soros and the Rockefeller Brothers — is so dominant in social media, that little is heard about the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, which also takes place in New York during the week of September 20-26. While it is not… more

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  • WB Double Edged Sword?

    The World Bank is currently reviewing a draft policy statement updating its “safeguard policies” for a proposed environmental and social framework. in 1982 the World Bank released its policy concerning indigenous peoples asserting that states’ governments seeking development loans that may have an affect on the interests and rights of indigenous peoples must demonstrate that… more

  • The Final Solution

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    Mark Kernan discusses the World Bank’s plans for out sourcing responsibility for social and environmental concerns to financial intermediaries–an escalation of the human rights and ecological catastrophes already well underway by the bank and its transnational corporate partners. more

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  • Hijacking Activism

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    Voices of indigenous peoples rightly belong in discussions on climate change and other issues of world import like human rights. Sorting out authentic activists — indigenous and otherwise — as well as agendas, is another matter. The main organizers of the People’s Climate March — Avaaz and 350 — are pied pipers funded by Soros… more

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  • FW Political Identity & Equality

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    In two articles I wrote for Indian Country Today (read HERE and HERE) I argue for the formal recognition of new political identities for the world’s indigenous nations–a political status that places these nations at a level of political equality with states, kingdoms and other internationally recognized polities. I argue for a mutually determined intergovernmental… more

  • Blind Eye to Genocide

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    Genocide against the Indigenous Ache people by U.S. ally, Alfredo Stroessner, President of Paraguay (1954-1989), will be tried before an Argentinian federal court. Well-documented reports of mass murder, rape, enslavement and concentration camps were ignored by US, British and other governments. more

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  • Netwar in the Northwest

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    The Native American rally in Seattle, to protect the Salish Sea from fossil fuel export developments in Washington and British Columbia, is a sign that Netwar in the Northwest is escalating. Indeed, coal and oil exporters — hoping to cash in on creating a colossal carbon corridor for Tar Sands bitumen, Powder River Basin coal… more

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  • Fourth World Center Stage

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    If you have been reading the news online, viewing on the television or listening on the radio you may notice that Fourth World nations are at the center of major events around the world. These events involve the stability, continuity or integrity of international states and the state system. Russia’s expansionist initiatives feature Fourth World… more

  • UN Dishonest Broker

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    The announcement by the UN Secretary-General on this International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples that indigenous peoples can act as “powerful agents of progress” belies the fact that the UN — since adopting the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in 2007 — has done everything in its power to see that… more

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  • Open Letter to Haudenosaunee

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    {This note was originally written to Kenneth Deer, a noted spokesman for  Haudenosaunee in international affairs. I have decided to share its content more widely today in English and Spanish} After more than forty years of “preliminaries” culminating in the state’s governments endorsing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples it would appear… more

  • Nations to Independent States

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    In the Fall 2014, Catalunya and Scotland will vote to determine if their nation will become an independent state. Many other Fourth World nations will look to see how these decisions unfold.  The nations of what was dubbed the Southern Sudan Autonomous Region of Sudan in 1972 suffered through civil wars with Sudan, established an… more

  • Bedlam in Gotham

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    Bedlam in Gotham is going to be a 3-ring circus: 1. September 20-21 People’s Climate Change March 2. September 22-23 World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 3. September 24-26 World Summit on Indigenous Philanthropy All the Ford and Rockefeller PR puppets from the non-profit industrial complex will be swarming for media attention to keep those grants… more

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  • Trafficking in Hate

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    Given the role religious hysteria plays in the spiritual warfare of Puritanical conservatism against socialism and the Indigenous Peoples Movement, it is heartening to see the launch of CARE, the Center Against Religious Extremism. A nefarious multi-million dollar campaign, designed and executed by American fundamentalists, is underway to drag the world back into the Dark… more

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  • States & Nations meet. The UN on the WCIP

    Indigenous nations such as the Onondaga, Mohawk, Seneca and Oneida have expressed deep concerns about the way the United Nations member states will carry out the High Level Plenary Meeting of the UN General Assembly on 22 September dedicated to identifying “best practices for implementing” the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Committed… more

  • The “Chia Histe”

    Commercializing natural or wild foods and medicines is not a new phenomenon.  It has been going on since the early colonizing of territories and peoples around the world.  The Chinese, Arabs, Turks, as well as the Maya, Romans, Persians, Egyptians, the Kingdom of Zaire…you name the epoch or the people and you will see that… more

  • Rohingya Nation in Crisis

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    The government of Burma (Myanmar) joined 143 UN member states on 13 September 2007 approving without reservation all of the principals and mandates contained in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Included in the mandates for endorsing states is that decisions by the state affecting the rights and interests of an indigenous… more

  • A New Day

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    Dinosaur’s like U.S. Supreme Court Justice Scalia might not know it, but it’s a new day in relations between indigenous nations and modern states. Diplomacy is the name of the game. As evidence of a fresh departure from the days when the U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs could patronize American Indian tribes… more

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  • A Mandate from God

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    A Mandate from God examines the driving force of the anti-Indian movement in the US. As implementation of UNDRIP becomes a significant basis for the exercise of jurisdiction by indigenous nations in Canada and the US, the most virulent opposition will come from the true believers of Christian Identity. more

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  • The CERE$ Network

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    In Climate Wealth Opportunists, Cory Morningstar presents part two of her investigative report on the non-profit industrial complex, and on the oligarchs that own it. In this part of the series, Morningstar examines CERES, “the clearinghouse for the institutionalization of private governance.” Creating complacency in a populace that embraces environmental protection required corporate investment in… more

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  • The Politics of Land and Bigotry

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    On March 8, 1996, the Center for World Indigenous Studies convened a conference at the Day Break Star Center in Seattle to consider strategies for a new public consensus about constructive environmental policies and cooperative relations between Indian nations and the people of the United States. As a participant in The Politics of Land and… more

  • Fascism in America

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    The Wise Use Movement of industry-sponsored violence against environmentalists and indigenous peoples is a fascist movement. Like the racist fascists and the theocratic fascists, Wise Use fascists deploy intimidation and thuggery as standard operating procedures. Sometimes, Wise Use fascists combine with or complement racist and theocratic fascists to achieve their goals. This appears to be… more

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  • Gateway Pacific Terminal Consultant Threatens Journalists

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    In a tragic comedy worthy of Shakespeare, Craig Cole, political consultant to Pacific International Terminals, has threatened two journalists and publications for exposing an apparent anti-Indian strategy by his employer, and for linking the anti-Indian hate campaign by right-wing media and the Tea Party to the political climate Pacific International Terminals actively created through its… more

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  • Confronting the Narrative

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    Our politics is a struggle that isn’t necessarily State-centric. At some point it concerns itself with the State, but it doesn’t mean that the State is the focal point of our concerns. At the end of the day, the concern of a communal government system is the safeguarding of its territory. The establishment of this… more

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  • A Rationalization of Theft

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    Fascism is the most lethal threat to the indigenous peoples movement and democracy in the United States. The Minutemen and Tea Parties are probably the most familiar of the white supremacy factions. As Paul de Armond noted in Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, volume 2, issue 2, 1999, “Fascism is a form of social change… more

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  • Oil War in South Sudan

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    As I wrote a hopeful post about the coming independence of South Sudan (population: 11,090,000) in February 2011 I warily pointed to soldiers from what became South Sudan who had fought against the South as members of the Sudanese Army, I worried about the decision to integrate these opposing soldiers into the South Sudanese Armed… more

  • Not Trusting the “Trustee”

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    Four-years after the US Secretary of the Department of the Interior established the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform the five member panel issued its Final Report on 10 December 2013. Commission members included Quinault President Fawn Sharp (Chair), Dr. Peterson Zah, First elected President of the Navajo Nation, Stacy Leech, Cherokee, Professor… more

  • Caravan of Doom

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    As Cory Morningstar writes at Wrong Kind of Green, the evil empire Buffett, Gates and Rockefeller built in the private sector is mirrored in the evil networks of NGOs they — along with Clinton — have constructed to provide cover for widespread environmental devastation, ethnic cleansing and Indigenous genocide committed by their corporate investments. Using… more

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  • Big Capital Big Green

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    Macdonald Stainsby discusses Tar Sands NGOs, foundation funding and how Indigenous peoples resistance to destruction of their territories by oil and gas companies is usurped by lapdogs of corporate philanthropies like Tides Canada. more

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  • Diplomacy in the Arctic

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    Iceland (one of the few true nation-states in the world) recently initiated and hosted the Arctic Circle – a nonprofit/nonpartisan conference designed to increase participation in Arctic dialogue and strengthen the international focus on the future of the Arctic. Despite its small population of just over 320,000 people, Iceland is geopolitically positioned to exert a… more

  • Church and State Series

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    My three-part essay Church and State takes a close look at religious hysteria in America and the spiritual warfare of Puritanical conservatism against socialism and the Indigenous Peoples Movement. more

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  • Constraining Hate

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    How to constrain hate campaigns is the subject of a recent ruling by the European Court of Human Rights. While the ruling regarding Hungarian fascist associations and their threatening behavior toward Roma (Gypsies) is not an indigenous issue, it contains discussion applicable to hate crimes and hate campaigns against indigenous peoples. As I noted in… more

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  • Never-Fading Flowers

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    Amaranth, along with other previously disregarded or banned food staples used by indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica, is receiving increased attention from policy makers, agronomists and nutritionists alike. Amidst global discussions on food security and climate change mitigation, this “never-fading flower”(as its Greek-derived botanical name refers to) is making a persistent re-entry into gastronomic, cultural and… more

  • Constructing the Sacred

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    In You Have to Choose, Amazigh writer Nuunja Kahina describes reclaiming spirituality rooted in North African indigenous values as a project of constructing the sacred. Colonized by Arabic language and Islam, Imazighen are recreating the cultural landscape that transcends the borders of modern states, and shapes their decolonial praxis. more

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  • Between Commitment and Venality

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    As Wrong Kind of Green reports, World Wildlife Fund is the #1 green lobby in the world. It is also the most corrupt. As exposed in the documentary film Silence of the Pandas, the World Wildlife Fund walks what WKOG calls, “a constant tightrope between commitment and venality,” displacing both wildlife and indigenous peoples in… more

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  • Praying New Leadership

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    Recently, a friend suffering from an autoimmune disease shared a healing anecdote that, while seemingly disparate, lends itself – I believe – to indigenous self-determination. The story was about an indigenous elder who invites a friend – less familiar with indigenous cultures and philosophies – to take a hike to a place where the “veil… more

  • Engaged Self-Determination

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    The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) held its 12th Session at the United Nations headquarters in New York City, May 20-31.  Tasked with reviewing the implementation of recommendations made at the previous year’s session, the UNPFII was subject to increasing scrutiny as the linguistic and political dust from each day’s meetings settled.… more

  • Still No Consent

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    The Arctic Council held its eighth meeting in Kiruna, Sweden this past week.  While news headlines covering results of the meeting have focused on the observer status position that China, India, Italy, Japan, Singapore and South Korea were granted – as well as the adoption of the Council’s Agreement on Cooperation on Marine Oil Pollution… more

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  • Reality in Mali

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    Writing at The Dominion, Sean Pittman looks beyond mainstream media myopia to discover the indigenous reality in Mali and the conflicting interests of Western powers that invaded the country earlier this year. more

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  • Fighting to the Death

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    As China and Canada compete to plunder the copper and gold of the Amazon, South American politicians like Ecuador’s President Correa promote a new era of indigenous genocide alongside ecocide. Destroying the rivers and biodiversity of areas like the Condor in order to supply luxury commodities to Asia and North America, while exemplifying all that… more

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  • Unity in Community

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    As Harsha Walia writes in rabble.ca, the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (KI) and Wet’suwet’en nations of Ontario and British Columbia have their own laws and traditions that conflict with those of Canada. As such, asserting their jurisdiction over their indigenous territories to enforce their natural law sometimes means running afoul of the Canadian government. But as Walia… more

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  • Earth Day Every Day

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    As corporations and politicians engage in economic environmental extortion over North American energy export of Tar Sands crude and Powder River coal, others are weaving a new narrative for survival. At the heart of that narrative are the sacred stories denoting the obligations and responsibilities of indigenous peoples to the health and well-being of all… more

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  • Native Trail Blazers

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    Native Trail Blazers is a cool online radio program. Be sure to check out their February 1, 2013 show with special guest Dr. Sharon Venne, Cree lawyer and indigenous advocate. Learn what’s up with Idle No More. more

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  • Language Church and State

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    Life is full of ironies, sometimes amusing, sometimes inspiring. As Phil Mercer reports at the BBC, an indigenous language in Australia, once thought extinct, is being revived thanks in part to the efforts of 19th Century missionaries who created a dictionary for the purpose of religious conversion. After the language was banned by colonial authorities,… more

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  • “We Decide”

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    When indigenous nations ask that their knowledge, their territories, their way of life receive the respect that all humans expect they ask that other societies act as mature human organisms. For the better part of eight years, indigenous peoples’ representatives to international climate change talks aimed at forging a new treaty have called on states’… more

  • Tuareg Under Siege

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    With uranium and gold mines in Mali at stake, the invasion by France with Canadian and US support signals an extension of the North African offensive initiated by NATO in 2012. As Western powers seek to consolidate control over Africa’s vast resources, the self-determination of indigenous peoples like the Tuareg is under siege. Roger Annis… more

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  • Easing Tensions in Araucania

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    The Mapuche Indigenous Summit, aimed at easing tensions in Araucania, proposed respect for their territorial integrity as a starting point for the Chilean state in fulfilling the treaties between Chile and the autonomous Mapuche signed in 1825. more

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  • A Dangerous Game

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    Under the tribal government system imposed on indigenous nations by the U.S. Government, governance of the Navajo Nation has long been corrupted by the corrosive influence of the coal industry. Now that tribal members are challenging their corrupted government, the U.S. Government and the coal companies in court as well as on the ground, Navajo… more

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  • Araucania Rising

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    As much of the world’s attention is on the indigenous uprising in Canada, the conflict between indigenous peoples and settlers at the southern tip of the hemisphere is escalating. While less intense than say Gaza or Chechnya, the battle between the indigenous Mapuche and the European settlers — who were given stolen lands within the… more

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  • Mali Malaise

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    Mali’s new military dictatorship is in the unusual position of being unable to militarily defeat the indigenous Tuareg secessionists, while at the same time being uncomfortable with asking NATO or other foreign armies for help. As Philippe Leymarie writes at Le Monde diplomatique, the army is demoralized, generals have stopped wearing their uniforms, and the… more

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  • Doing the Numbers

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    The economy of Canada has long been dependent on the theft of indigenous peoples’ resources. Cree, Algonquin, Dene, Anishnabe, Inuit and Ojibway resistance to this theft has been ongoing. Canada’s response has been to send in the army and RCMP. As a new awareness of this theft dawns in Canada, the corporations and governments that… more

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  • Ending Canada’s Colonialism

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    With indigenous protests, demonstrations and blockades erupting across Canada recently, many might be wondering what’s the deal? Canada endorsed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2010. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper met with Assembly of First Nations Chief Shawn Atleo a year ago in a Crown First Nations Summit. What more… more

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  • A Colossal Fraud

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    In Colonialism and the Green Economy, Daniel C. Marotta and Jennifer Coute-Marotta report on the reality of the REDD carbon market scheme in Chiapas, where the Mexican government is relocating independent communities from the forest to camps created through UN Millenium Development programs designed for the benefit of carbon polluters in the United States. Contrived… more

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  • A Hazardous Path

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    As the UN Security Council approves an African-led military force to intervene in the Mali civil war, France, the US and the African Union bring their own interests to a conflict over the rights of indigenous peoples, complicated by Islamic fundamentalists seeking to take advantage of inter-ethnic hostilities to attack former colonial powers and AFRICOM,… more

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  • Inherited Responsibility

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    Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo says First Nations in Canada will not stand down while Canada seeks to develop their natural resources while neglecting the treaty rights and human rights of the country’s one million Indigenous People. Atleo says the inherited responsibility of the First Nations to protect the land and… more

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  • Exclusion and Revolution

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    Arundhati Roy discusses exclusion and revolution in India, where 100 million indigenous people of the interior sit on top of vast quantities of ore coveted by corporations, and the 100 families that rule India’s billion citizens by brutal military force have abandoned any pretense at democracy. more

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  • Gangster Capitalism

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    Galdu reports on how indigenous activism in Russia merits a visit from the Russian police and torture by the secret service. Gangster capitalism at its best. more

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  • Dina Gilio-Whitaker Joins FWE & CWIS Research

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    Dina Gilio-Whitaker joins contributors to the Fourth World Eye with a background in American Indian culture, education and history with a Masters degree in Native American Studies and American Studies from the University of New Mexico. Her research interests emphasize decolonization theory, indigenous environmental justice, and international indigenous issues. As an undergraduate she graduated summa… more

  • Great White Father Syndrome

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    The Great White Father syndrome displayed by the governments of Canada and Australia toward indigenous peoples this week has deep roots. Rooted in European Christian colonialism, the edicts handed down in Ottawa and Canberra over federal education policy reek of nineteenth century imperial racism. Holding indigenous communities’ benefits for such things as decent housing hostage,… more

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  • Culture Honor Trust

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    Culture is a complex entity of political, economic and spiritual dimensions. The language, beliefs and values of a culture find expression in such things as music, song and dance, as well as in arts and crafts, fashion and style. As cultural properties, these attributes join governance and religion in distinguishing one particular culture from another.… more

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  • Power Down

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    Conservation is more than a sound social practice; to indigenous peoples it’s a law of nature. Common sense terms like waste not want not no doubt have roots in tribal societies. In fact, conservation, cooperation and reciprocity represent the core values of indigenous nations–something settler societies based on consumption, competition and larceny have a hard… more

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  • A Racially Discriminating Society

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    During the fossil-fueled extravaganza after World War II, Indian tribes in the United States were still recovering from the traumas of colonization; coerced displacement, religious conversion, and the brutal abuse of their children in state-supported, church-run Indian boarding schools was still contributing to their social, cultural and political dysfunction. Not until the 1970s did tribal… more

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  • Cole’s Coal

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    In the interest of full disclosure, prior to my transition to Bay Area citizen, I was an environmental activist in the Salish Sea–an area that includes the San Juan Islands, midway between Seattle and Vancouver, British Columbia. As such, I came to know the Lummi Indians, as well as a corporate politico by the name… more

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  • Stand Up and Say No

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    In my June 26 editorial Extinguishing Sovereignty, I discussed how the extortion practiced by the Government of Canada toward its indigenous First Nations — as a means to terminate their continued existence as culturally distinct peoples — was in violation of all international law related to racial discrimination and human rights. While not a surprise,… more

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  • Mali Update

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    While the UN Security Council debates military intervention in Mali, it appears regional peacekeepers in West Africa are headed toward some sort of military intervention in order to allow the interim Mali government and indigenous rebels to sort things out, without creating further humanitarian tragedies. In a region plagued with poverty, drought and remnants of… more

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  • CWIS Monitoring Adaptation Committee

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    The CWIS Climate Change Monitor continues to monitor meetings of states’ governments and indigenous peoples throughout the year between sessions of the Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  The annual December sessions have been disappointing in terms of their productivity since the failure to establish a treaty agreement in… more

  • Tar Sands Racism

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    Last week, the Nobel Women’s Initiative sent a delegation to speak with women in the Canadian province of Alberta about the impact of the Tar Sands oil mining on them, their families and communities. As Nobel Laureate Jody Williams notes in her observations, the denuded Boreal forest area of the Tar Sands project is geographically… more

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  • Preparing for Battle

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    In illuminating conflict between modern states and indigenous nations, I frequently examine aspects of the psychological warfare involved. Often, this psywar includes references to religious values that distinguish one side from  the other. While these references are increasingly coded for marketability, occasionally dominant society participants let their hair down, so to speak, and express deep-seated,… more

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  • Abiding in the World

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    I would like to draw readers attention to two Indigenous blogs: First Peoples, a blog about new directions in Indigenous studies, and Turtle Talk, a blog about Indigenous law and policy in the United States. As Daniel Heath Justice noted in First Peoples blog, Indigenous literary expression contributes to the diversity of perspective, lending a… more

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  • Ancient Knowledge Systems and IGC Bioethics

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    The UNESCO International Bioethics Committee and the member states of the Intergovernmental Bioethics Committee commenced the 19th Session of the IBC at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris on the 11th and 12th of September to consider the “Draft Report of IBC on Traditional Medicine and its Ethical implications.”  The draft contains numerous flaws and perhaps… more

  • Good Government

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    As the governments of the United States and Mexico clamp down on Indigenous community projects to reinvigorate good government, it might be a good time to ask why it is that the central powers would want to prevent Indigenous governments from providing for their people. Have the modern states of Mexico and the US become… more

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  • One Canoe

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    As a recently returned resident on the shore of the Salish Sea, I am pleasantly inspired by the indigenous peoples and their lovely canoes. As a region of many nations, this beautiful sea has strong guardians. more

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  • Trading Post Indians

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    Writing at the Dominion, Sandra Cuffe reports on how Canadian mining companies are using Canadian indigenous consultants as fronts to deceive indigenous communities in Latin America. more

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  • Tool of Liberation

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    As David P. Ball reports for the Tyee, indigenous residential school survivors left out of an agreement with the Government of Canada have filed a class action lawsuit for the “intentional infliction of mental distress”. Citing the many abuses endured as part of the Canadian holocaust, the survivors hope the redress of their grievances will… more

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  • Mobilizing Resentment

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    In the early 1990s, national Anti-Indian organizations joined the Washington Association of Realtors and the Building Industry Association in Washington state to create property rights groups with sufficient funding and organizational support to defeat implementation of Growth Management environmental protection by altering the political climate. Key to that Wise Use Movement task was the recruitment… more

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  • First Nation Jurisdiction

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    With the backing of the Assembly of First Nations, Aroland Nation of Northern Ontario has declared a moratorium on mining exploration and development, and issued eviction notices to 20 mining companies operating in their territory. Invoking First Nation jurisdiction against the companies and the governments of Canada and Ontario could be one of the most… more

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  • Kabylia

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    As reported by Karlos Zurutuzi at IPS, the Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylia — an indigenous resistance to colonization in Algeria — has a history extending back to the seventh century, when Arabs invaded the territory of the Amazigh (Berbers) across North Africa. Having fought both the Arabs and later French invaders, the six… more

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  • Right to Demilitarize

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    With the mobilization of the Indigenous Guard and community action against military violence in their territory, the Nasa councils of Colombia  are asserting their right of self-governance under international law. more

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  • Demilitarizing Araucania

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    As paramilitaries funded by big landowners draw in the military and police of Chile, the Mapuche seek international support in preventing the militarization of their indigenous homeland of Araucania. more

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  • No Small Achievement

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    Writing at Bolivia Rising, Julieta Paredes observes that while the Indigenous peoples  reclamation of their rightful place in Bolivia still has things to work out with the state apparatus, the legitimacy of the Morales administration is not questionable. Although transnational corporations and foreign states like the US do all in their power to undermine the… more

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  • Living the Revolution

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    Speaking at Women’s Worlds 2011,  Cherokee activist scholar Andrea Smith discussed the liberation of Indigenous women from the non-profit industry and state institutions attempting to co-opt their movement for colonial purposes. more

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  • Aymara Delegation Visits Center

    A delegation of education and cultural leaders from Bolivia sponsored  by the US Department of State People-to-People Program met for a briefing at the Center for World Indigenous Studies on 3 July 2012. Dr. Rudolph Ryser, Dr. Leslie Korn and Marlene Bremner met the delegation. As a part of an ongoing collaboration between the Center… more

  • Becoming Practitioners

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    While reestablishing a spiritual connection with all of creation is undoubtedly the way to save the soul of humanity, making that connection is easier said than done. Since most of the harm inflicted on creation is by the disconnected consumer societies, breaking the spell of advertising — that compels them to consume toxic products and… more

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  • Prensa Indigena

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    Voices Through Time video looks at recovering identity in the Peruvian Andes through the Network of Indigenous Communicators and community radio. more

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  • Extinguishing Sovereignty

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    There’s a term in law to describe coercion to extract something of value from someone under the threat of the commission of serious harm. When the threatened party has already experienced egregious harm by the threatening party, the reality of the threat is taken into account when determining the punishment of the perpetrator. Depending on… more

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  • Preventing Discussion

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    As Indigenous delegations bring their message about sustainable development to the UN conference in Rio, the Brazilian military detains hundreds of Indigenous delegates enroute. Posted in Climate Connections, Indigenous Environmental Network photojournalist Ben Powless captures the images of the day. more

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  • Total War

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    With war as America’s largest export, it should perhaps come as no surprise that warmongers with experience in government, or even the war-making industry, should end up in executive roles in the non-profit sector. After all, they’re in academia and media, and occasionally get awards like the Nobel Peace Prize, so why not the leadership… more

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  • Prone to Corruption

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    There are some general things that can be said about democracy. Democracy first and foremost is a process, but not all democracies are the same. Some disperse power broadly, while others concentrate power to varying degrees–the more dispersed, the more democratic. Voting, elections, and representative democracy — a system imposed on Indigenous societies by European… more

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  • Green Capitalism

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    As Brenda Norrell notes at Intercontinental Cry, green capitalism is not the solution to the climate change crisis, it is part of the problem–allowing the profiteering countries of the world to continue to stalk and destroy nature for profit. In fact, she observes, the devastating effects of capitalism are at the root of the reason… more

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  • Making Amends

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    In this short video, Andy Mager, Syracuse Peace Council coordinator for the Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation, discusses plans for a Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign in New York state. With the 400th anniversary of the treaty with the Haudenosaunee next year, living together in peace and friendship and respectfulness is one way, says Mager,… more

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  • Ultimate Non Sequitur

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    Call something green — be it jobs, economies, or consumer items — and progressives fall all over themselves to embrace it. No matter that the green sociopolitical project (now on a planetary scale) means handing over more power, profits and social control to the very elites who caused the global financial crisis, and are responsible… more

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  • Beyond Their Wildest Dreams

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    Collective amnesia and social attention deficit often erase the memory required to understand where new phenomena like green greed came from. Of course, greed isn’t new, nor is fraud, but this particular combination might be new to those just encountering it. It’s why we have memory systems like archives, stories and films. In the 20th… more

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  • AFRICOM v Africa

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    For indigenous peoples in Africa, maintaining traditional culture is a constant battle. Having survived European colonialism and its successor dictatorships, tribal societies and Fourth World nations on the African continent now face oppressive regimes financed by Chinese corporations and Western institutions like the International Monetary Fund and World Bank. As competition stiffens for the chance… more

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  • Gendarmerie Royale

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    Back in January when Canadian Prime Minister Harper and Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver demonized environmentalists and First Nations opposed to government plans to violate the Canadian constitution and international law on behalf of the Enbridge oil pipeline, we noted that characterizing political opponents as enemies of the state would have unsavory repercussions. As reported… more

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  • The Time That Has Come

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    When the Zapatista uprising appeared in world media in January 1994, it wasn’t out of the blue; Mayan communities had been holding assemblies to discuss the ramifications of armed defense of their democratic way of life for well over a decade. What was new was the alliance with non-indigenous Mexican revolutionaries, born in the national… more

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  • Legitimizing Theft

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    The Global Indigenous Youth Caucus, presenting at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues recently, made a case against the UN World Intellectual Property Organization as a monopolistic manifestation of piracy. As Gale Courey Toensing reports at Indian Country Today, one of WIPOs main functions is to legitimize theft of Indigenous Peoples genetic resources and… more

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  • International Intervention

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    Writing at Indian Country Today, Karla E. General examines the conflict between the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and US law. In the wake of the Ninth Circuit decision that desecration of sacred Native sites does not represent a substantial burden to Native American religious practices, tribes like the Navajo Nation are… more

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  • Dismantling Colonialism

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    As the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools nears its halfway point in its five year mandate, its 2012 report makes clear that when they are through, the dialogue about the colonial treatment of First Nations can finally begin. Writing in The Dominion, Sandra Cuffe reminds us that the commission itself was the… more

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  • Cultural Conflict

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    As illustrated by this Indian Country Today article about the Winnemem Wintu, the war between the United States of America and the Indigenous nations that underlay its boundaries is ongoing. No longer an armed conflict between the U.S. Army and Indigenous warriors, the American agenda of assimilating Indigenous peoples and annihilating Indigenous cultures continues. more

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  • Heart of Africa

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    Indigenous peoples in Africa face many obstacles to living a free and independent life: Chinese, European and American corporations, AFRICOM, Christian evangelicals and Islamic fundamentalists to name a few. Awash with weapons from the Pentagon and corrupted by the corporations, states like Uganda are a nightmare for environmental and human rights activists, Indigenous or otherwise.… more

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  • Clarion Call

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    On Indian Country Today, Steven Newcomb examines the history of terrorism as a method employed by empires and states against Indigenous nations and peoples. As the foremost tool for enlarging their territories and maintaining control over them, terrorism by empires and states deploys the psychology of fear against all opponents. In the case of the… more

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  • Right to Live Free

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    Writing in Indian Country Today, Lise Balk King examines the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples within the context of the international human rights regime. As an expression of humanity’s aspirations, says King, UNDRIP — like the Universal Declaration of Human Rights — looks to international law and global consensus to provide a… more

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  • Biodiesel v Biodiversity

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    Writing in Galdu, Shadrack Kavilu reports on the World Bank’s role in the creation of poverty. Working in partnership with palm oil plantation corporations and transnational financial institutions, the UN agency continues to fund development to serve the insatiable appetite of rich countries, while plundering the resources of Fourth World nations  and indigenous peoples. For… more

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  • Texting Tseshaht

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    In today’s issue of The Dominion, Anna Luisa Daigneault discusses multimedia Indigenous language revitalization in British Columbia, as well as the spiritual healing of elders who survived the residential schools. more

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  • Out of Gas

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    Imagine calling 911 and being told the ambulances aren’t running because they’re out of gas. Or finding everything in the refrigerator warm because the electricity is only on for six hours a day. Welcome to Gaza. As Electronic Intifada reports, this is not unusual, nor acceptable in a first world country, even in a Fourth… more

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  • Newroz

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    As Kurds from Turkey to Iran celebrate Newroz (Kurdish New Year), Kurds in Turkey support a referendum to decide the future of Kurdistan. As an Indigenous nation extending across Syria and Iraq, in addition to Turkey and Iran, Kurdistan has everything going but its own state. That may happen in the future, but for now… more

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  • Nowhere Else to Go

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    As Beth Walker observes in her post at Minorities in Focus, the proliferation of conflicts over mining on tribal peoples lands isn’t just a reflection of growing network awareness of market theft and institutional impunity; it’s also a reaction to the sizable increase in the scale of operations and intensity of extraction by transnational corporations.… more

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  • IC Espanol

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    One week from today, our friends at Intercontinental Cry launch a Spanish language edition. Underway are efforts to follow that with editions in Chinese, Portuguese, German, French and Italian. Ambitious as this sounds for an all volunteer publication, the Indigenous news magazine — founded by Mohawk editor and publisher John Ahni Schertow — is well… more

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  • Back to the Future

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    Adventure, dignity, fulfillment. Art, cosmology, medicine. In which of these are modern societies advanced in comparison to traditional indigenous ones? A thousand years ago, Maori sailors ventured to what would someday be named Peru, and returned to what would someday be named New Zealand with potatoes grown in the Andes. At the same time, Kiowa… more

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  • Sustainable Economies

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    Robert J. Miller, a citizen of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe, has a new book  out titled Reservation Capitalism: Economic Development in Indian Country. Professor Miller teaches at Lewis and Clark Law School, and is an engaging  author and speaker. His earlier books include Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies, which… more

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  • Public Relations Puppets

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    In Poznan, Poland in 2008, the UN excluded indigenous nations delegates from participating in climate change talks, insinuating that only UN member states are legitimate governing authorities. The motivation for the United Nations exclusionary policy on indigenous peoples participation was that the UN was meeting to hatch a new scheme for transnational corporations and investment… more

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  • Ogoni Political Restoration – OCIA

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    The Ogoni Nation voted with 813,000 favoring votes (98% of the electorate) to establish the autonomous Ogoni Centeral Indigenous Authority (OCIA) as their government empowered to regulate Ogoni social, economic, political and cultural life in their Niger Delta country. The Ogoni Nation led non-violent opposition to the Shell Oil company’s criminal degredation of their river… more

  • Australia Nukes Aborigines

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    When the Australian government invaded the Northern Territory, they said it was to protect Aboriginal children. Now we know it was to militarize the region in preparation for using Aboriginal lands as a place for the government to dump nuclear waste. Suddenly, Australia’s opposition to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples makes… more

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  • Inuit Go For It

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    The Inuit of Nunavut and Greenland are one people, so why not use broadcast communications that surmount the artificial boundaries imposed on Inuit territory? As the Nunavut Inuit explore developing Inuit TV, those boundaries may someday seem less important than the culture underlying them. Like the Saami of northern Norway and Sweden, their language and… more

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  • Seeds of Life

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    In telling the story of food, Winona LaDuke discusses such topics as food security, biodiversity and climate change. Comparing industrial and indigenous nutrition, LaDuke examines human relationships with the seeds of our ancestors–what she describes as the seeds of life. more

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  • To Fulfill Their Dreams

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    Reading Peter d’Errico’s account of the United States government’s shell games in usurping international law in its larcenous efforts against the Western Shoshone nation, I am reminded that the longer an empire goes on, the more corrupt it becomes. Ever since the founding fathers of the American empire set out to swindle indigenous nations under… more

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  • Double Standard

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    As Sarah Hunt observes in her article on Media Indigena, theft of indigenous peoples’ property is a normal activity under colonial settlement. Whether that theft is by individuals, government, or corporations, it reflects a seriously derelict double standard. Devoid of integrity, the colonial mindset that excuses theft from indigenous families, communities and nations is something… more

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  • Australia Out of Control

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    Following on the heels of international condemnation for its inhumanitarian intervention against the Aboriginal People of the Northern Territory, the Australian government has opted for full scale invasion and imposition of a police state. In response to the out-of-control conduct by the Australian state, the APNT ask non-indigenous Australians to help them make a Stand… more

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  • Can’t Be Trusted

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    To the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, the violations by the governments of Quebec and Canada of resource sustainability agreements with their First Nation are all they need to show Canada and Quebec can’t be trusted. More fundamentally, however, the Algonquins call into question the legitimacy of imposed governance under international law. While the government of… more

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  • Hope Belongs to the Resistance

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    In a 2005 interview with Raymundo Sanchez Barraza, In Motion Magazine looked at A University Without Shoes. In discussing the indigenous intercultural system of informal education developed by the Mayan culture of Meso America,  Barraza describes the key components of democracy, self-learning and reciprocity within the panorama of the Zapatista struggle. Emerging from the margins… more

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  • FED by NED

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    In the old days of the CIA and National Security Agency (NSA), official US Government organizations were more candid about overthrowing governments that did not succumb to domination by US corporate or military misadventures. Then Wikileaks happened upon US State Department cables and our view of international diplomacy changed forever. Today, CIA-sponsored rainbow revolutions —… more

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  • On the Land

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    When indigenous communities have a genuine say in development, they can preserve their way of life and that of the animals with which they share the land. In Namibia, that means a future where they can remain on the land and engage with the outside world without sacrificing their sovereignty. more

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  • Beating the Odds

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    Most of the news about indigenous peoples is bad: states, corporations and vigilantes threatening, assaulting or murdering them in order to steal their land and resources. Occasionally, though, we hear of indigenous communities — often in collaboration with civil society supporters — that surmount the odds. For one Guarani community in Brazil, beating the odds… more

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  • A Disastrous Combination

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    From cradle to grave, indigenous peoples worldwide have born the brunt of nuclear contamination and the lethal diseases that accompany the nuclear power industry. From mining uranium to dumping nuclear waste, tribal communities in North America, Southern Africa and Australia have suffered most from radioactive land, air and water, while nuclear promoters on Wall Street… more

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  • World Dominance

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    Watching the violent clashes worldwide between indigenous peoples and modern states, one might be inclined to wonder what’s at the root of the problem. Is it just philosophical values, control of territories and historical injustice, or is there more to it? With food riots and other uprisings becoming a regular global occurrence, it might be… more

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  • Birth, Death and Renewal

    Hysteria rising from the dooms-day theologies grips large pieces of the world’s human population as they attempt to use the Mayan end-of-cycle date of December 21, 2012 (Winter Solstice) as a confirmation of their “end of the world” fears. In a strange way, this failure to truly understand the Mayan system of knowledge while imposing… more

  • ‘Human Safaris’ in India

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    Uncontacted until recently the Jarawa of the Andaman Islands in India are exposed to potential abuse. Disrespectful tourists come in droves to take photos and make illegal films of the Jarawa inside their homelands. As described in a recent article in the Guardian, human rights activists have protested that the government was “making a circus”… more

  • Amazigh Autonomy

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    Indigenous Amazigh of Algeria and other North African states seek autonomy through government decentralization and official recognition of Berber languages. Students meet with resistance from police in Arab states fearing a spread of the democratic uprising begun in Cairo last year. more

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  • Civilized to Death

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    The short documentation, Civilized to Death, gives an in depth analysis of the social determinants of health among First Nation groups in Canada. Underlying mechanisms for consistent indigenous ill health likely hold true in other indigenous contexts. Part 1 Part 2 more

  • Planet Earth

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    Over New Year, the Planet Earth international seminar was held in Chiapas to discuss the importance of the 1994 Zapatista uprising in context of resistance to neoliberalism now taking place across the globe. In examining the dysfunction of the modern state, the Committee of Indigenous Solidarity issued a special report, Another Way of Seeing the… more

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  • Roots

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    Sometimes it helps to remember where you came from. In this Wikipedia snapshot of CWIS, we can trace our current efforts to those of our founders and the predecessor organization World Council of Indigenous Peoples. It’s been a long hard road, but a lot has been accomplished, and with luck, those whose lives we’ve touched… more

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  • Globalization Canadian Style

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    Arno Kopecky writes in The Tyee that Canada is beginning to feel like Peru; having covered the conflict between Peruvian President Garcia and indigenous peoples there, Kopecky notes the demonizing of First Nations recently by Canadian Prime Minister Harper has the same tone. The problem with that, says Kopecky, is that it paves the way… more

  • Risk of Extinction

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    In asking the question whether the UN will  live up to its commitment to indigenous peoples, Intercontinental Cry notes the notorious track record of the institution in marginalizing indigenous peoples in its own processes. Indeed, in examining the UN system, we discover many programs aimed at undermining indigenous societies, cultures and values. Perhaps most noteworthy… more

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  • Inter-species CO-OPeration

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    The Great Laws of Nature, a video posted via Intercontinental Cry, highlights the positive, systemic effects that the revitalization of local, indigenous agriculture has had on the Muskoday First Nation.  In addition to asserting the benefits of healthier soils, plants, and people, the video demonstrates the cooperative relationship between humans and other species that is… more

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  • Above the Law

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    Aboriginal leaders in Canada are disturbed by the behavior of the Prime Minister and his cabinet in promoting oil pipelines through indigenous territories prior to environmental review. As if it wasn’t enough that Ottawa ignored the First Nations’ concerns, Prime Minister Harper and the oil companies he represents are now mobilizing resentment toward indigenous peoples… more

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  • Demolishing Democracy

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    When modern states like Chile and the United States abandon all pretense of being democratic political entities, the citizenry and indigenous nations of these states have only one option left: civil disobedience. Diplomacy with these fully-owned corporate states is senseless; armed insurrection against these police states is suicide. Within this scenario, pro-democracy scholars, activists and… more

  • Children of the Sunrise

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    In 2007, four countries in the world opposed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. In 2008, the police and armed forces of the Government of Australia invaded Northern Territory Aboriginal communities with the intent of seizing control of their homelands. In 2011, the story… more

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  • A Search for Meaning

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    What was it that made Celts Celts as they migrated over centuries from the Caucasus Mountains across the northern Mediterranean and the Iberian Peninsula to the British Isles? According to Dr. T. Anantha Vijayah, in his Fourth World Journal article Digitizing Worldviews Intangible Cultural Heritages, it was their stories. As they recorded and retransmitted ideas… more

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  • Crown First Nations Gathering

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    Reading the current issue of First Nations Strategic Bulletin (unfortunately not available online), I was reminded of the book The Science of Coercion. In the articles and commentary by leading indigenous activists, scholars and political figures in Canada, FNSB examines issues surrounding the upcoming Crown-First Nations Gathering on January 24 in Ottawa. Perhaps of greater… more

  • Concerned Citizens X South Sudan

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    The following press release comes from a colleague in Juba, South Sudan.  It serves as an example of what indigenous people in South Sudan are doing in order to reorganize and redefine themselves as an autonomous nation: Concerned Citizens Say: Wear White for Peace on CPA Day JUBA   5th January 2012 South Sudan welcomed its… more

  • Mexico’s “War on Drugs”

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    Mexico’s violent “War on Drugs”, backed by the United States government and transnational corporate interests, has come to dominate global headlines, but behind the graphic images of mass graves and decapitated bodies, a lesser-known war against indigenous peoples is being waged.  Equally as worthy of local, regional and international attention, this war is steeped in… more

  • Turtle Champagne

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    UCLA professor Duane Champagne always has something interesting to say about indigenous peoples and their struggle for self-determination. His new book, Notes from the Center of Turtle Island, promises to be a stimulating discussion about indigenous identity, community, and relations between indigenous nations and modern states. more

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  • Money for Murder

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    Reminiscent of the Reagan era, Central America is again the target for US-funded state violence against socialists and indigenous peoples. This time around, however, the Obama Administration is promoting the privatization of military death squads once embraced by his ideological mentor Ronald Reagan. As US State Department Secretary Hillary Clinton prepares to finance privatized vigilantes… more

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  • Noise

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    In the 1971 book Crimes of War, Robert Jay Lifton described theatrical militarism as the inevitable conclusion of US dominance. Looking at the role militarism plays in today’s media, it’s not surprising that mainstream news is mostly noise generated to drown out other points of view. As Lifton explained, the collective psychic trauma and delusions… more

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  • Masire Minority

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    As the Society for Threatened Peoples reports, the indigenous Masire (Berbers) of Libya have as much to fear from the Arab majority as they did under the Gaddafi regime. After playing a major role in overthrowing the Arabic tyrant, it now appears the Masire militias may end up having to defend the indigenous mountain tribes… more

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  • Axis of Evil

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    Readers might recall that a year ago, responding to Obama’s July 2010 decision to lift the US funding ban for Indonesian death squads, Indonesia’s elite forces began assassinating indigenous Papuan spiritual leaders. Survival International ran a story on that  last December. Today, Intercontinental Cry reports on the massive Indonesian military offensive (supported by Australia) against… more

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  • Mexico Profundo

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    In his seminal book Mexico Profundo, Guillermo Bonfil Batalla describes the collective body of indigenous resistance within Mexico as the Profound Mexico—“an entity that has resisted invading forces for centuries and that keeps resisting, appealing to diverse strategies, depending on the scheme of domination to which it is subjected” (Batalla, 1996). Nowhere is this creative… more

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  • Who Needs Enemies?

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    As an alliance of indigenous peoples and forest dependent communities observing COP 17 remarked, the UN carbon market program known as REDD was devised by and for transnational corporations and the states they’ve corrupted into promoting earlier anti-democratic agreements like NAFTA. Placing one’s hope in REDD, concludes the alliance, makes no sense; it allows the… more

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  • Climate & Food Security: Re-thinking Vulnerability

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    Landing at Puerto Vallarta International Airport in Mexico’s western state of Jalisco felt risky and appropriate: it was October 11th, the same day that hurricane Jova was expected to make landfall. The threatening category 3 storm was just off the coast as I was beginning my research assistant position on “Indigenous food security adaptation and… more

  • Climate Change Ghost Dance–Duck and Cover

    Even as delegates of states’ governments, businesses, labor, non-governmental organizations and indigenous peoples meet in Durban, South Africa for the last week of a two week negotiation, many observer have concluded, “the UN climate talks failed long ago.” In an apparent effort to avoid accounability under the commitments made as a signator to the Kyoto… more

  • Rude Awakening

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    It’s a rude awakening for the innocent, but international institutions like the UN are every bit as deceitful and disingenuous as its member states and the transnational corporations they represent. Attacking the UN and other bodies charged with guarding human rights for dereliction of duty or hypocrisy is not always a popular task, but it… more

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  • Heart of Darkness

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    Given the potential for genocide and ethnic cleansing in Central Africa, the African Commission’s Working Group on Indigenous Populations reports on the Republic of Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo are likely worth reading. Replete with strategic minerals, Central Africa is already on the Pentagon’s radar, as well as that of China. With another large… more

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  • Look in the Mirror

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    While the UN and its agencies are competent at documenting the plight of indigenous peoples in the world, the institution itself is often complicit in the harms caused by transnational corporations working in collusion with its member states. Ending the exclusionary practices and policies within the UN toward indigenous peoples is the least it could… more

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  • Assassinations in Brazil

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    It’s never been easy surviving as an indigenous person in Brazil, but in the era of human rights and multiculturalism, it’s shocking to witness hit men hired by ranchers for the purpose of exterminating indigenous leaders. Leadership is a precious gift and sacred obligation, and when it is extinguished it is hard to replace. Survival… more

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  • Preventing Kyoto Protocol Burial

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    The International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change presented its statement to the Adhoc Working Group on the Kyoto Protocols yesterday in Durban, South Africa at the Climate Change Treaty negotiations.  Ben Powless of the Indigenous Environmental network presented the following statement:  Thank you Mr. Chair, I speak to you on behalf of the International… more

  • Natural Food Security: Quinua, Hauzontli, Chia

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    The United Nations 26 November began debate on a draft resolution declaring 2013 as the International Year of Quinua. The resolution notes that the peoples of the Andean region have maintained the essential cultural relationships between the people and the land to ensure the continued existence of the cereal food Quinua.  Quinua (Chenopodium quinoa) is… more

  • Free Education Free Minds

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    A few years back, CWIS fellow and Yakama Nation elder Russell Jim told of his youth and his rescue by his aunt from government run Indian boarding schools in the United States. Describing the humiliating experience designed to denigrate his indigenous heritage and longhouse spiritual traditions, Russell recalled his aunt’s determination to protect him, even… more

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  • Atmosphere of Hostility

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    The recent loss of the Schaghticoke Nation’s community pavilion to arson is tragic enough, but the fact that tribal leaders believe it is the consequence of actions by the State of Connecticut is disturbing. Back in 2005, when wealthy non-Indian landowners nearby the Schaghticoke reservation successfully lobbied the Bureau of Indian Affairs to rescind federal… more

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  • Final Solution

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    If you look at the sum of UN programs rather than its pieces, a different picture emerges. As storytellers, it is our task to paint that picture through narratives that capture the totality of what is happening. While minor concessions are being made to placate indigenous peoples and their civil society friends, ethnic cleansing on… more

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  • Displacing Sustainable Ways

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    The governments of Germany and Russia have teamed up to bring the Nenet people of the Yamal Peninsula into the modern age through energy development on their indigenous territory. The Nenets, reindeer herders practicing sustainable, ancient animal husbandry, can now cease their independent nomadic ways and join other displaced tribal peoples in urban slums where… more

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  • The Sin of Theft

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    Globalization clearly got off on the wrong foot with 15th and 16th century European explorers seeking to plunder indigenous peoples’ property. As the Indian Law Resource Center reports, the World Bank is on the verge of reversing its meager 20th and 21st century humanitarian policies in favor of initiatives that would replicate those of centuries… more

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  • Love and Beauty

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    If art is the essence of life, then love and beauty are its expression. One way we express these human sensibilities is by communicating through the visual medium. With the advent of the Internet and blogging platforms, individuals worldwide have been able to convey their love of landscapes full of diverse forms of beauty that… more

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  • Biofuel Genocide

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    Intercontinental Cry reports on the Ethiopian government’s genocidal initiative on behalf of Malaysian biofuel entrepreneurs. Violence against the indigenous Omo has already begun. more

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  • Traditional Knowledge and Modern Science

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    Traditional knowledge is more and more in the focus of attention. Especially in the circumpolar North Indigenous knowledge it is acknowledged can be crucial to better understand the dynamics and effects of climate change. Collaboration between scientists and indigenous peoples on the ground has been increasingly brought about. A recent article based on findings published… more

  • Suicide Prevention

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    Suicide remains an epidemic among Alaska Natives most of who have been affected by the tragedy of suicide in some way. To improve health and decrease rates of suicide and substance abuse in Indigenous communities a decolonization process is needed based on the principle of self-determination Evon Peter, Gwich’in commented in his speech at a… more

  • Nations Ruling States

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    After 42 years of rule by one indigenous nation (Gaddafi), personified in the dictatorship of Muammar Gaddafi, the state of Libya is as of 20 October 2011 in the hands of a multinational directorate–the National Transitional Council (NTC). In the Gaddafi city of Sirte, Muammar Gaddafi was captured and executed by the Misrata Military Council.… more

  • Dr. Mirjam Hirch

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    She was an intern at the Center for World Indigenous Studies in 2001 and then she took on the important responsibilities of a CWIS Fellow focusing on Traditional Medicine Policy.  She traveled to Tajikistan, to Switzerland, Mexico and Australia advocating the development of an implementation of policies in governments and international organizations that will advance… more

  • Usual Suspects

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    Rotten to the Core might have been a catchier title for this post, but blaming poverty pimps like the Congress of Racial Equality for gaming the system of corporate philanthropy misses the mark. CORE always played it safe where it came to power politics, stabbing in the back authentic activists like those in SNCC, whose… more

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  • Appoint Tauli-Corpuz to UN Post

    The United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) is preparing to appoint a new UN Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism in its new term. The Center for World Indigenous Studies, along with numerous other organizations and leaders has endorsed Ms. Victoria Lucia Tauli-Corpuz from the Philippines to fill that post. Vicky, as many know… more

  • Native Voices Exhibition

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    An exhibition “Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness,” opens today at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. The exhibition tries to ‘map’ an Indigenous cultural approach to understanding concepts of health and illness exploring the interconnectedness of health disease and culture. Dramatic inequalities dominate Indigenous health in many parts of… more

  • Reset

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    In preparing for winter talks with Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo says it’s time to reset the relationship between Canada and the First Nations. While closing the gap between funding to the provinces and funding to the reserves for health, education and housing is an immediate priority,… more

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  • Creativity and Consciousness

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    A study by Johns Hopkins, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, concludes that use of psilocybin (magic mushrooms) increases creativity, artistic appreciation and curiosity. The study notes that this discovery about how this entheogen changes how people perceive themselves and their environment is unprecedented, but for indigenous peoples, raising consciousness is an ancient and well-known… more

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  • GMO vs Natural Foods and Good Health

    After more than six thousand years of row crop agriculture virtually all foods in the grocery store have been so altered they are “almost without nutritional substance–so Allison Stevens asserts in her online article: Nutritional Value of Wild Foods verses Cultivated Foods. Human cultivation produces “hybridized” plants and animals; and such interaction between people and… more

  • Respectful Coexistence

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    As colonial constructs imposed by European powers, the states of Canada and the US perpetuate illegitimate claims on North America that cannot be legitimated without the consent of First Nations and  indigenous peoples. Yet, despite the recognition of indigenous rights under international law, the domination of these states that continues to deprive indigenous societies of… more

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  • China & Russia and Information Weapons

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    The governments of Russia, China, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan urged in a September 12, 2011 letter to the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon that he distribute to the 66th Session of the General Assembly an “International Code of Conduct for Information Security” to regulate and restrict uses of the Internet. While the proposal specifically warns… more

  • Language and the Right to Decide

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    The United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) met three days ago to engage in an “interactive dialogue” with James Anaya, Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Vital Bambanze, Chairperson of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to consider how “language and culture” influence protection of the identity of indigenous… more

  • The Morality of Mining

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    As indigenous peoples become more effective at confronting governments and mining companies intent on destroying their water and land for precious metals, the narrative of globalization is becoming aggressively defensive. Melody Kemp writes on the morality of mining. more

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  • Uncommon Grounding

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    A short while ago, Duane Champagne wrote about the intent of Canada and the United States to use the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a tool of assimilation. Indeed, in reluctantly “endorsing” the human rights instrument, both governments explicitly restricted their belated “support” to existing relationships between their respective states and… more

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  • Preserving Adaptability

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    I’ve often remarked that indigenous connections with landscape reflect a continuity of both location and observance recorded in aboriginal memory systems. Reading Sahara: A Natural History by Marq de Villiers and Sheila Hirtle, I am struck by how little understanding we display today of the vacillations of landscape associated with long atmospheric cycles, erratic orbits,… more

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  • Pathways to the Future

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    For all peoples, social theories and cultural vision are pathways to the future. In Identity and Theory, Duane Champagne discusses moral order, spiritual balance, and the continuity of community from an indigenous perspective. more

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  • Thought Leaders

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    As someone who also works behind the scenes in support of indigenous activism and scholarship, I especially appreciate the efforts of indigenous grassroots media. As a regular reader of Intercontinental Cry, I can attest to the value of having timely and accurate information in attempting to get a top view of conflicts that affect indigenous… more

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  • Intercultural Education

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    In order to initiate an institutional dialogue between the Mapuche nation and the Chilean state, the Mapuche Federation of Students — with support from the Federation of Students of Chile — is demanding the establishment of a Mapuche University. more

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  • Grievous Injustice

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    Since 1963, when the UN ceded control of the former Dutch colony of West Papua to Indonesia, the West Papuan peaceful struggle for independence has been met with brutal repression by the Indonesian state. On this 48th anniversary of their struggle, the West Papuan people appeal to the international community to overturn the grievous injustice… more

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  • From the Ruins

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    Over the last five hundred years, wealthy Europeans devastated the original societies of the Americas. Of course, they had a lot of enthusiastic help from less than wealthy Europeans, but by and large they grew rich while the rest of us muddled by. Now that they have cannibalized the system that supplanted the indigenous one,… more

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  • Beware

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    Betrayed by covert relationships between an oil company and an NGO offering to assist indigenous peoples, the Guarani learn a valuable lesson about intermediaries. more

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  • Eco Echo

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    Before the American oil boom in the Amazon that poisoned the land and rivers of indigenous peoples over the last half century, there was the rubber boom. As noted in Survival International, 100 years ago tens of thousands of Indians were enslaved and murdered for rubber extraction by British companies. Today, while slavery and murder… more

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  • Poisoning the Water

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    Responding to the scientific evidence that the level of fish consumption by Indian tribes is unhealthy under existing water pollution standards, the state of Oregon this summer took dramatic steps to increase its water quality.  Meanwhile, in the neighboring state of Washington, Governor Gregoire just signed into law a major exemption from clean water standards… more

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  • Oiling Haida Gwaii

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    August National Geographic looks at the Great Bear Rainforest and Canada’s bid to become a global player in the petroleum market. With Alberta’s oil sands second only to the oil fields in Saudi Arabia, the proposed supertanker expressway known as Northern Gateway — planned to navigate the treacherous archipelago to Kitimat, British Columbia — is… more

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  • Mapping Life

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    Systems of tenure differ vastly between colonial states and indigenous nations. In Indonesia, colonial systems of tenure perpetuated by the successor state continue to plague indigenous peoples throughout the vast Indonesian archipelago. From West Papua to East Timor, the indigenous system of land and forest tenure has over the last half century encountered fierce repression… more

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  • Bound to Backfire

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    With the joint announcement last month by the Assembly of First Nations and the National Congress of American Indians to support each other in gaining control of indigenous lands and resources, the Canadian government must have gone into overdrive on its surveillance of First Nations leaders and activists. Already coordinated in this effort for the… more

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  • Wipeout

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    As Americans return from fossil fueled adventures on the highways and skyways of summer vacation, indigenous communities on the fossil frontier disintegrate in a cloud of toxic waste. Already living a Mad Max reality extending from the Alberta Tar Sands to the Niger Delta, they serve as eyewitnesses at the ground zeroes of the global… more

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  • A Totalitarian Objective

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    Privatization, first and foremost, is a totalitarian objective. The goal of eradicating the public interest depends on this misanthropic philosophy. Subjugating public institutions to market tyranny, however, involves more than just greed and the misery it ensures. Pitting the poor against each other as they grovel for life’s basic necessities also mobilizes resentment against any… more

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  • Political Climate Change

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    In his Moscow Times op-ed, Vladimir Ryzhkov, State Duma deputy from 1993-2007, notes the Kremlin’s waning interest in seeking accommodation with the Council of Europe. Having weathered a flood of criticism and unfavorable decisions by the European Court of Human Rights for its abuses in Chechnya and Georgia, the Russian Federation, says Ryzhkov, appears to… more

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  • Decriminalizing Consciousness

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    In light of the colossal failure of the world war on drugs, one might think the United Nations would step forward to end the human rights abuses and official violence associated with this misguided global project. Given the fact that psychoactive plants have provided therapeutic medicinal relief to humankind for millenia, one might imagine the… more

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  • Oceans of Toxins

    The oceans that feed and nurture life the world over are increasingly poisoned by human activity with the result that the oceans are “experiencing severe declines in many species to the point of commercial extinction … an unparalleled rate of regional extinction of habitat types (eg. mangroves and seagrass meadows), … and now face losing… more

  • Facade of Understanding

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    As noted in this article at Indian Country Today, the Obama Administration’s endorsement of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples comprises a facade of understanding, while largely continuing the status quo. As Duane “Chili” Yazzie, Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission chair put it, “The declaration recognizes Native American possession of distinct rights… more

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  • Dreams of Humanity

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    The success of the rule of law depends on who is making the law, or breaking it. The failure of the rule of law occurs when those people are one and the same. The failure, dramatized in the WTO Ministerial in Seattle and numerous gatherings by lawless milieux since, demonstrate only a continuity of the… more

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  • Perspective Proportion Design

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    In his article at Indian Country Today, Duane Champagne discusses academia’s propensity to pay lip service to Native American studies without allowing it to flourish from the perspective of Native American students, scholars, and intellectuals. more

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  • Vast Values Divide

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    When Crystal Willcuts says being respectful, truthful, and caring is un-American, she is observing the vast values divide between indigenous peoples and American culture, which she describes as immature, greedy, and deceitful. Of course, our culture is not static, and while Willcuts’ description is generally accurate, we are now two generations into a revaluation that… more

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  • IWGIA

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    International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs this month highlights the concept of self-determination. Check out IWGIA links and resources on this and other human rights topics. more

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  • Co-opting Consciousness

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    In his June 2009 article Greenwashing Eden, Michael Barker examined the connections and motivations of BINGOs like Conservation International. Exploring the vast conflicts of interest inherent in wasteful corporations funding conservation and indigenous rights policy worldwide, Barker notes that the primary purpose behind such well-endowed philanthropic conservation work is to limit the range of alternatives… more

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  • A More Holistic Tradition

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    In the beginning, it must have puzzled indigenous peoples why the Europeans were so aggressive and ungrateful. Later, having gotten to know more about Christianity and corporations, indigenous societies came to realize the Europeans — for whatever reason — had chosen the wrong fork in the road, opting for the values of greed over those… more

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  • Ahniwanika

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    John Ahniwanika Schertow, editor of Intercontinental Cry and web manager at Oneidas for Democracy, is also an interesting journalist. Take a look at some of the articles he’s written about issues of importance to indigenous peoples. You won’t be disappointed. more

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  • Traditional Knowledge

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    Conservation International fellowships are available for research into contributions of traditional knowledge in adapting to climate change and maintaining biodiversity. Applications should be submitted by June 30. more

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  • Nineveh Plains

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    In the fact-finding mission report The Last Generation?: The Situation of Assyrians in Northern Iraq, the Assyria Council of Europe examined prospects for provincial autonomy within the Nineveh Plains of Kurdistan. As Christian communities in the Kurdish region of an Islamic state, the survival of Assyrian culture depends in part on the establishment of governance… more

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  • Aboriginal Media

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    In the current issue of the International Journal of Communication, Rebecca Porlier reviews The New Media Nation: Indigenous Peoples and Global Communication by Valerie Alia. more

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  • Act of Murder

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    Steve Newcomb at Indian Country Today details how the Bill of Rights would be terminated by the Global War bill before Congress. Of particular interest to readers here, Newcomb explains why this is also the latest in a five century line of justifications by Europeans to murder indigenous peoples any time, any where, for any… more

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  • False Promise

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    Emblematic of the false promise made by UN states to indigenous nations, Brazil’s industrialization of the Amazon illustrates why the international institution is incapable of upholding the human rights of indigenous peoples. Even if it weren’t for the fact that UN agencies like the World Bank actively assist member states in destroying cultural and biological… more

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  • Institutionalized Aggression

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    Institutionalized aggression can take many forms; in the UN, agencies like the World Bank and the Security Council reward economic and military aggression with positions of privilege vis-a-vis other states. Indeed, nuclear arms play a key role in determining which states have the greatest influence in world affairs. Legitimizing aggression with the UN imprimatur allows… more

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  • Struggling to be Heard

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    Twenty years ago in Washington state, in response to a citizen uprising against environmental destruction subsidized by state coffers, the legislature enacted Growth Management. A landmark law requiring protection of natural resources from real estate and industrial development, as well as protection of state coffers typically wasted on industrial scale projects without consideration of alternatives,… more

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  • Climate Talks in Bonn – outside the room

    The International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change is working to participate in climate change talks in Bonn, Germany beginning this week.  The two week meeting of the ad hoc working groups on long-term cooperative action (AWG-LCA) the Kyoto Protocols (AWG-KP) discuss the procedures for participation in talks and language on adaption strategies.  Both of… more

  • Crimes of Church and State

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    Mother Earth Journal reports that Reverend Kevin Annett was arrested and deported from England over the weekend. Annett, a human rights activist from British Columbia, is an outspoken advocate for indigenous children killed through violence and neglect at church-run residential schools in Canada and the United States. Hounded at home by the RCMP and church… more

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  • Mass Communication

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    Commercial advertising and public relations firms operate from the principle that repeated exposure to a product or idea makes them desirable or legitimate. Placing those products or ideas in locations where consumers frequent increases the likelihood of successful persuasion. Reading editorials from leading indigenous publications recently, I was struck by the apparent lack of awareness… more

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  • Yasuni

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    Every story has more than one side. In this film trailer by Raul Paz Pastrana, the story of the Yasuni rainforest is told from the view of its indigenous inhabitants, the Huaorani. The government of Ecuador has stated it will hold up oil drilling in this part of the Amazon for $100 million. As protectors… more

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  • IK and Medicine

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    In this short video, the San healers of Southern Africa explain the challenge of curating their indigenous knowledge and taking control of their medicinal resource management. more

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  • Dominant Doctrine

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    Peter d’Errico discusses the Doctrine of Discovery dilemma at the UN, where member states that inherited indigenous lands from invading Christian empires are panicked about the pressure to examine the legitimacy of their current dominance over Fourth World nations. As he notes, pretending to care and seek reconciliation rather than make amends only adds insult… more

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  • An Alternative Path

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    Denmark continues to play a significant role in the world indigenous peoples’ movement. Over the last decade, the peaceful transition of the Danish territory of Greenland to indigenous self-rule, and the Danish involvement in helping build indigenous capacity for autonomy in Bolivia, have served as role models for European and North American states still stuck… more

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  • The Sacred Fire

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    As noted in Upside Down World, Zapatismo is alive and well in the caracols of Chiapas, but self-rule in these autonomous indigenous communities is anything but easy. Community cohesion, the sacred fire of their authentic democracy, is maintained by discipline and sacrifice–an achievement under constant threat and harassment by state authorities and paramilitary vigilantes. Watching… more

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  • A Criminal Act

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    In the war between biodiversity and privatization, the battle in the Andes over protecting the genetic diversity of indigenous potatoes from an invasion of genetically modified seeds from the United States illustrates the colonial attributes of Free Trade. As an act of theft, the GMO agenda of supplanting indigenous food and medicine with monopolized foreign… more

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  • Criminal World

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    In an increasingly criminal world, covenants, treaties, and conventions recognizing aboriginal title mean little if laws acknowledging indigenous rights aren’t enforced. In Michoacan, Mexico, where indigenous forests have been illegally liquidated by criminal gangs, indigenous communities have had to make a stand against both the gangs and local police who back them up. In Tanzania,… more

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  • Funding Feudalism

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    Under the Reagan administration, protecting US-friendly feudalism in Central America went hand in hand with privatizing clandestine military operations. The crimes against humanity committed by foreign death squads, trained at US Army schools, primarily targeted peasants mobilized by liberation theology against brutal feudal systems that had been around since Europeans first enslaved and massacred entire… more

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  • Preventing Disease

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    The Batwa of Uganda are thought to be the oldest tribal people on the planet, but their eviction from their homeland forests has caused many problems in their health and cultural survival. Dr. Scott Kellerman and his wife Carol decided to do something about that, and through their clinic that works in collaboration with indigenous… more

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  • Eyes on the Prize

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    Not all Nobel Peace Prize winners are warmongers like Henry Kissinger and Barack Obama. Some, like Rigoberta Menchu, actually earn the prize. Menchu, a noted Mayan activist, will run for the presidency of Guatemala as the indigenous Winaq Party candidate. more

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  • International Brigades

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    International brigades that joined the fight against fascism in 1930s Spain have had a lasting effect as role models. So much so that anarchists and socialists today often adopt their attire and nomenclature as they fight the tyranny of globalization. While the tactics of this struggle differ from its predecessor, the strategy of solidarity remains.… more

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  • Tribalism Revisited

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    Perusing the archived documents on my Scribd account recently, I noticed my essay on Tribalism is clearly the most popular, followed by Prepared to Lead and Walking Around Ideas. As these three essays relate directly to my work with the Center for World Indigenous Studies, I thought they might interest new readers. more

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  • Euskal Herria

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    The Spanish Constitutional Court has lifted the Spanish Supreme Court ban on Basque political parties running candidates for election. Spanish nationalists in Madrid continue to oppose civil rights for the pro-independence Basque parties located in their indigenous territory of Euskal Herria on the Bay of Biscay. With the recent referendum of support for an independent… more

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  • In the Way

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    Free Trade, like privatization, is systematic theft. As key components of globalization, these mechanisms target indigenous peoples’ resources, state treasuries, and public assets for conversion to private equity holdings. Chief Juana Calfunao, a leader of Mapuche in Paillalef Araucania, has suffered horrendous abuse by Chilean authorities for her role in protecting the human rights of… more

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  • Counteracting Violence

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    It might work to the benefit of tribes as well as tribal activists and their allies to discuss means of counteracting free market violence. Analysis of such things as communications in conflict, research as organizing tool, networks and netwar would be not only useful in guarding indigenous governance, but help to clarify the experience and… more

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  • Struggling to Survive

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    In Peak Psychotherapy, Abundant Human Connection, Carolyn Baker explores the emotional repercussions of collapse. Examining the mental health infrastructure for treating illness associated with industrial civilization, Baker observes that many are turning to indigenous traditions that resonate more fully with their deeper humanity. “As health care disappears,” says Baker, “humans will be forced to heal… more

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  • Defeating the Free Market

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    As the energy and mineral extraction industries move into the final phase of wasting creation, indigenous governance remains an obstacle to unimpeded greed. Guarding indigenous governance, then, becomes more than a human rights or environmental concern. In essence, protecting indigenous nations from the relentless onslaught by the Free Market is now a key element in… more

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  • Free Market Media

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    Writing for Religion Dispatches, University of Florida Religion and Nature professor Bron Taylor discusses International Mother Earth Day, and the attack on indigenous spirituality by the Free Market media flagship Fox News. more

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  • Free Market Violence

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    As a species, community is integral to our health and well-being. The disintegration of community — especially among indigenous peoples — due to Free Market violence, poses a significant obstacle to healing from previous traumas. As we seek means of reintegrating community, we will simultaneously be dealing with new traumas associated with ongoing Free Market… more

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  • A Peaceful Heart

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    Onondaga Chief Oren Lyons once said nature has no mercy, meaning what goes around comes around. Poisoning the planet poisons us. Chief Lyons went on to relate that the values that underpin the economic system of wasting creation have to change, or humankind will perish. As such, Lyons noted, leadership will not come from institutions… more

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  • Tracker

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    On April 4, the New South Wales Aboriginal Land Council launched Tracker, a new magazine offering analysis and investigation of land rights, Aboriginal issues, and the challenges of institutional racism across Australian society. Green Left Weekly interviews Chris Graham, the co-founder of Tracker and former editor of National Indigenous Times. more

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  • Fighting the National Security State

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    Invoking the jurisdictional authority of indigenous nations, while supported by international law, is nevertheless viewed by secret federal agencies as a threat to the national security state. Denying corporations and militaries access to indigenous territories, in order to protect their resources and cultures from annihilation, is tantamount in the minds of federal intelligence bureaucracies to… more

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  • Between Governance and Genocide

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    On March 25, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights held a hearing on the subject of indigenous jurisdiction arising in Andean states. As the international human rights regime explores legal pluralism within internationally recognized states, instruments like the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and ILO 169 continue to guide the discussion on… more

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  • Meitheal

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    I recently received a note from a colleague in Ireland who promoted the concept of meitheal (cooperative learning) for use in higher education. Having proven its worth through steadily improved student satisfaction and performance, the professor challenged competitive models introduced by corporate benefactors attempting to impose their will on the university. While he has had… more

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  • Globalization

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    In their analysis of climate injustice, Maryan Adrangi and SK Hussan note the escalating globalization by NATO and the G20 coincides with increasing militarization against indigenous peoples, undermining their struggles for self-determination, especially when they live in resource-rich areas. Some of that militarization, observe Adrangi and Hussan, is directed at indigenous peoples in Canada, the… more

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  • Until You Look

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    A lot has changed since 1996, when leading researchers, analysts and activists convened at the Daybreak Star Center in Seattle to discuss the politics of land and bigotry, but one thing that hasn’t changed is the need for tribal peoples to conduct ongoing investigative research on their opponents, adversaries and enemies. Monitoring the overt activities… more

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  • Knowledge is Power but Power Controls Knowledge

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    We might think from a western view that Indigenous peoples in fourth world circumstances need to be empowered, but in reality, we already know what real power is and how it works. Reality is, we are waiting for western cultures to grow up, and to exercise a more spiritual and ethical power-with that is respectful… more

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  • Not Small Potatoes

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    To most people today, intellectual property is something software and pharmaceutical companies claim for their inventions. But for indigenous peoples worldwide, intellectual property includes such things as traditional medicines, knowledge, and foods. In its recent decision, the UN Intellectual Property Tribunal ruled South American Indians should receive 1% royalties on the profits from potato sales.… more

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  • Libya, A Broken State

    When as state is broken (meaning it cannot control its borders, its laws are not universally observed, there is a central government that exercises sovereignty over the territory, but is fragmented, and it fails to have a single military or police capacity to protect the borders and secure the population), then the international community has… more

  • Ecotourism

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    Ecotourism managed right can be a boon to indigenous communities, but the decision to capitalize on conservation has to be their own. Otherwise, tourism is just another invasion of indigenous privacy. In the United States, ecotourism on indigenous lands created our most magnificent national parks, as well as sacred site desecration and traffic nightmares. Some… more

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  • Mapuche Liberation

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    Last week, four indigenous leaders in Chile were sentenced to 20+ years in prison for their involvement in Mapuche activism. As the half million Mapuche of the Southern Cone continue to seek sovereignty and self-determination under the UN human rights regime, Chile continues to use anti-terrorism laws from the Pinochet era to thwart Mapuche control… more

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  • Go to Commercial

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    Different societies and cultures respond to crisis in different ways. As Tokyo tries to downplay the threat of nuclear meltdown, the German Green Party has mobilized an anti-nuclear campaign that may land it the next premier of their country. In the United States, the federal government is busy figuring out how to spin its way… more

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  • Dominance

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    How many times have you heard people say nothing ever changes? How often does this fatalistic attitude serve as an excuse to be lazy, cowardly, or otherwise self-indulgent, rather than responsible, upright good citizens? How does this philosophy enable dominance? I’ve written extensively about applying the public health model to societal maintenance — a system… more

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  • Harvard Handmaid

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    In yet another episode of the handmaid’s tale, Harvard is hosting Christian apostles whose claim to fame is exorcising witchcraft and demonizing gays. (Indigenous spirituality is one of their targets.) Bruce Wilson has the goods on the upcoming conference. more

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  • Perverted Policies

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    Annie Bird reports on the latest anti-indigenous developments in Guatemala, where Mayans are being evicted from their homelands by the army and police to facilitate biofuel plantations. Repeating the colonial pattern that displaced earlier generations of Maya from their lands, vigilantes are being encouraged by state authorities to harass, assault, and murder Mayans on behalf… more

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  • Opening of exceptional circumpolar institute- EALAT

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    Indigenous peoples and scholars are gathering in the far North today for the opening of a unique circumpolar institute, the EALAT Institute, in Kautokeino, Norway. A Sami elder states about who made the many leaders of the circumpolar region come together in a day of lectures and celebrations: “The reindeer has given us a very good… more

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  • A Sacred Undertaking

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    The failure of the modern state to meet our needs is structural–an inherent design flaw that renders essential reform of this structure impossible. Having relegated local and regional participation in setting social policy meaningless, the plenary powers of state-centric institutions are an open invitation to tyranny. Indeed, the voluntary confederation that respected regional autonomy at… more

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  • The Runner

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    Western Sahara and Palestine share three essential commonalities: they are both indigenous nations, they both speak Arabic, and they both remain militarily occupied by foreign powers dependent on support from the United States of America. The Sahrawi people have fought European colonizers, as well as neighboring states eager to seize their lands, and many have… more

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  • Devil in Details

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    Marine Reserves, like biosphere reserves and other officially protected areas, are popularly associated with conservation of the environment, and thus widely supported. But in today’s world, forty years down the road from when the first Earth Day catalyzed public environmental consciousness, official pronouncements don’t always tell the whole story. As usual, the public process conceals… more

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  • Between Crisis and Catastrophe

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    Intercontinental Cry reports on the Wixarika Declaration against mining in the ceremonial center of Wirikuta, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. As the traditional authorities state, “We convoke the whole world to join the effort to avoid this terrible destruction of the sacred, definitively opposing the dark interests behind it, which seek our spiritual death.” As mining… more

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  • Expelled from Paradise

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    The video Conservation Refugees looks at the practice of expelling indigenous peoples from their ancestral homelands to make national parks devoid of humans. Begun in the United States in locations like Yosemite, Yellowstone, Olympic and Grand Canyon, removing peoples close to nature has not only created refugees of once prosperous cultures living in harmony with… more

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  • People of the Standing Stone

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    The Oneida Nation, one of the five founding nations of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy), has a history of facilitating communication between Americans and Indians. During the American Revolution, they were well known and respected by Washington, La Fayette, and the Continental Congress. For their guidance and support in crafting the U.S. Constitution, they were granted… more

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  • Title Fight

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    Enbridge, the corporation hoping to build a pipeline from the Alberta Tar Sands to coastal British Columbia, has said they will pay First Nations one billion dollars to end their opposition to the plan. So far, First Nations in Alberta and British Columbia aren’t selling. But bribery is only half the equation. The other side… more

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  • Mother Language

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    The eleven indigenous language families must be fully supported throughout Canada says National Assembly of First Nations Chief Shawn Atleo. Under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, he notes, First Nations have the right to revitalize and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions and philosophies. Commemorating International Mother Language… more

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  • Ways of Knowing

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    The University of Oklahoma Native Science Speaker Series will discuss the integration of Western science, traditional knowledge and ways of teaching that interact with the indigenous sense of place. As part of the effort to develop ongoing cultural leadership among Native students, speakers will address the interface between traditional ecological knowledge and earth system science. more

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  • Ambassadors of Greed

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    As Indigenous Environmental Network spokesman Tom Goldtooth remarked after the 2009 UN Climate Change talks in Copenhagen, he had never before witnessed the intensity of deception perpetrated by industrialized countries and large non-governmental organizations. To prevent that deception from being challenged, UN officials, having invited indigenous delegates to participate, turned around and prohibited the Indigenous… more

  • Pashtun Taliban Talks and the War with No End

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    The Pashtun Taliban have many different groups among them fighting against NATO forces in Afghanistan. Some of these troops are now secretly engaged in talks with the Americans.  The US government initiated contact at the suggestion of Obama’s Special Envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke (recently deceased). The New Yorker’s Steve Coll will publish… more

  • Philosophy of Privilege

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    In the 1990s, when I was embroiled in the property rights political turmoil that catalyzed the modern militia movement, the cast of characters engaged in vigilantism and the grievances they promoted were pretty much the same as they are today. Their rebellion — fueled by racism, religious fundamentalism, and beliefs about international conspiracies — culminated… more

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  • Peyote Pathways

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    When I first encountered peyote in the powdered form known as mescaline, it was still a legal substance in the United States. That changed in 1970, but was later amended to exempt members of the Native American Church when using peyote for religious purposes. As hippies seeking to escape the madness of American society, we… more

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  • Looking in the Mirror

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    Ending the drug wars responsible for so much misery at the hands of US military proxies is slow going, but that hasn’t deterred the president of Bolivia from defending the right of indigenous peoples to use coca leaf. Locked into the militarized anti-narcotics mindset that continues to demonize this mild stimulant used daily by the… more

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  • Shining a Light

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    I have occasionally written here about dominion theology and religious colonization as part of the indigenous experience that forms a backdrop to many of the ills and unresolved grievances we face today. But while we struggle against the backwardness and cruelties of religious fundamentalism, we must also acknowledge the role of liberation theology in shining… more

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  • The Andean Revolution

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    As Peru begins making payments to indigenous widows and disabled survivors of the 20-year war against the Quechua highlanders, Ecuador has arrested Shuar political figures currently organizing a nationwide indigenous peoples political party. While the Sendero Luminoso liberation army fought the Peruvian army for Quechua independence, the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador is seeking… more

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  • Cunning Ruse

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    Retired law professor Peter D’Errico writes in Indian Country Today that the Obama administration, while pretending to support American Indians, is undermining their rights under international law to control their own affairs. By playing games with language regarding the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, President Obama and Secretary Clinton may think they’ve… more

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  • Health and Wealth

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    As this Wikileaks article from December 2009 notes, the issue of intellectual property has made the World Health Organization vulnerable to spying by the pharmaceutical industry. Already beholden to corporate philanthropy, WHO is in many respects similar to the World Bank–committed to the status quo due to economic dependence. While these corporations seek total control… more

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  • Indian Killer

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    As I noted in Thursday’s post, the Oneida president of the United South and Eastern Tribes, Brian Patterson, says it’s time for the Indian nations to challenge the plenary power of Congress in order to move beyond the era of US dominance of indigenous peoples. Today, in an article concerning the boundaries of the Oneida… more

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  • GMO Profits and killing the Seed

    Political leaders, academic and corporate leaders alike credit bioengineering and related technologies as 21st century achievements that will feed the world and cure diseases. In just a few short years, businesses have popped up in the market place to garner billions in profits from genetically modified foods, pesticides and herbicides and human ears and noses… more

  • New World Order

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    As preliminary arrangements are made to convene an international conference of nations and states to discuss how to implement new, cooperative relationships between indigenous peoples and metropolitan populations, agenda items will undoubtedly include such matters as climate adaptation and economic globalization. Within this new framework for discussion and negotiation, global dialogue on how to meet… more

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  • Pilgrims and Indians

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    Examining the conservative media backlash against Native American spirituality, Indian Country Today looks at the language of savagery and its roots in US history. Using the controversy over the Yaqui blessing offered at a ceremony in Tuscon, organized by the White House in response to the murder of a federal judge, the ICT article allows… more

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  • Great Rift

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    In the 16-minute video When The Water Ends, we learn that the Horn of Africa is a climate change hot spot. And as the climate heats up, so does conflict over water. Produced by MediaStorm for the Yale Environment 360 conference, the video features the people of Lake Turkana and the Omo River struggling to… more

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  • Roots of Removal

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    Emulating the strategy used in Colombia, US officials are now coordinating with Guatemalan officials on plans for removing indigenous communities. Using military, police and mercenaries to clear indigenous peoples in order to make way for biofuel plantations has proven a quick and effective method of gaining control of indigenous homelands. Under the pretense of fighting… more

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  • Walking the Red Road

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    A few years ago, I spoke about the world indigenous peoples’ movement and how their spirituality and its relationship with the environment makes them particular as a group. In 2003, Minnesota Public Radio produced an eight-part series on American Indian traditional spirituality and how it provides moral guidance, a sense of belonging, and a commitment… more

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  • Eyes on the World

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    For scholars and activists involved in indigenous peoples’ liberation, understanding digital media is an essential aspect of Fourth World communications development.  As First Nations assert their rights under the international human rights regime, managing human rights documentation incorporates both library and information science, as well as video production, editing and archiving. As a leader in… more

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  • Against the Wild

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    A while back I wrote a commentary on the current conflict between nomadic and settler culture in my ancestral homeland of Ireland. In that commentary, I opined that the drive to control free peoples and wild landscapes might have something to do with resenting loss of one’s own freedom. Reading Indian Country Today this morning,… more

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  • On Their Own Terms

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    Residing on the north side of the Golden Gate, I daily encounter young Mayan mothers pushing strollers through the park where I walk my dog; Mayan children perhaps outnumber all others at our neighborhood elementary school. I often wonder what stories their parents have to tell. Reading the anthology titled The Anthropology of Globalization last… more

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  • A Signal Moment

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    As the Chilean government faces international criticism for the recent police and military attacks on the Rapanui parliament, it also faces a looming deadline set by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights for its brutal abuses of Mapuche political activists. For the 19 million indigenous people of Chile, it is a signal moment, one where… more

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  • Murderous Ideology

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    At first glance, the murder of a federal judge and attempted assassination of a member of the US Congress may seem to have nothing to do with indigenous peoples. Even if one takes at face value the fact the six victims massacred and twelve wounded in Tucson, Arizona on Saturday might have been associated in… more

  • Building Hope

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    As noted in this photo essay on COP 16, indigenous peoples might have been excluded from UN climate change talks in Cancun, but they were not silenced. As The Dominion photojournalist Allan Lissner reports, the Cancun Agreements climate scandal exposed by Wikileaks “were not the result of an informed and open consensus process, but instead… more

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  • Fighting for Freedom

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    In what might be termed a classic neoliberal response to the peaceful quest for freedom by indigenous peoples, the government of Chile recently attacked the Rapanui parliament, clubbing women and children in the process. For Chile, which is facing the reality of indigenous autonomy in the form of resistance to neocolonial development on property belonging… more

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  • Art and Science

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    A while back I quoted the late Haida artist William Reid as saying art is the essence of life. Having lived in Haida Gwaii, immersed in a living landscape housing one of the greatest concentrations of public art and learning in the world, Reid knew of what he spoke. Like the natural beauty of the… more

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  • Serious Surrender

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    Glenn Morris, a scholar from the Fourth World Center for the Study of International Law and Politics, observes that the State Department report — documenting the conditional US endorsement of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples — seeks to “persuade indigenous peoples that we’ve lost our international legal personality–and that is a… more

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  • Pause to Think

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    As mentioned here previously, palm oil plantations — promoted by corporations marketing biofuel and other first world luxuries — come at the expense of forests, biodiversity, and the indigenous peoples that inhabit ecologically intact territories. As the consumption of these luxuries proceeds in tandem with fraudulent green initiatives like REDD, the corporate lobbyists’ slush funds… more

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  • Rhetoric and Reality

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    In December 2009, when President Obama cut a back room deal at the UN gathering in Copenhagen, using threats and bribes to undermine indigenous peoples’ participation in climate change talks, that was reality. When he promoted his Copenhagen Accord on behalf of major polluters as progress, that was rhetoric. In July 2010, when President Obama… more

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  • Murder for Money

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    Real News looks at the 18–year lawsuit by five indigenous tribes in the Ecuadorian rainforest against Chevron Texaco. The suit, in which Texaco was proven to have dumped billions of gallons of toxic waste into Amazon rivers, has repeatedly been delayed by Chevron in order to wear down the plaintiffs. Meanwhile, the waste dumps continue… more

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  • Maintaining Traditional Governance

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    With Canada’s half-hearted endorsement of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples looming in the background, Algonquins in Quebec are challenging Ottawa to abandon Department of Indian Affairs imposed elections, which they claim cause harm to their social fabric. Insisting on their rights under the Canadian constitution as well as international law, the… more

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  • Moral Conscience

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    When the moral conscience of a society no longer tolerates overt attacks on indigenous cultures by the dominant powers, the powerful have to resort to covert operations and public relations in order to undermine these most forceful opponents of globalization. This can come in the form of funding death squads that murder indigenous leaders, in… more

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  • Abya Yala v Obama

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    Abya Yala, the indigenous communications network that met in Colombia last month, has issued a Declaration of The First Continental Summit of Indigenous Communications. The summit, called to develop plans for protecting indigenous identity and culture through strategic use of communications, focused on ways to build production capacity, including a traveling school of communication. Specifically… more

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  • Double Standards

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    As Irish author David Cronin notes in his new book, the European Union is deeply in bed with Israel, which explains why when it comes to human rights, the EU double standards are especially hypocritical. With only the European Parliament asking tough questions about economic and military support for the Israeli apartheid state, the military… more

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  • Faded From View

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    Americans by and large are immune to outrage over petty lying and graft. Slush funds, tax evasion and conspiracy to defraud—ordinary stuff. Then Wikileaks shined a light on the pathogens that had managed to reinfect the ideoscape after Watergate and Iran-Contra had faded from view. Hillary Clinton caught spying on UN officials, Barack Obama funding… more

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  • Tanking Tar

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    The video Oil in Eden magnificently captures the spirit of life fiercely defended by Coastal First Nations and their friends in Canada’s British Columbia. United in opposition to Enbridge Oil’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline, the indigenous led network extends for thousands of miles and thousands of years. Singing a different song from the song of… more

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  • Genocide in Colombia

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    Colombia’s indigenous representatives call on Canada and Canada’s First Nations for protection from violence that threatens their very existence. UN special rapporteur on indigenous peoples James Anaya has called on the UN special advisor on genocide to intervene. more

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  • Big Trouble

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    In this post, Deputy Special Envoy Jonathan Pershing of the US State Department says that balance is the key to making progress on climate change. He also lauds transparency as essential to the effort. Progress and balance though, as determined by the carbon cartel and promoted by the United States, make a mockery of the… more

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  • US Government on UNDRIP: Yes, but No

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    US President Barak Obama, standing before a conference of Indian government, Alaskan Native and Hawaiian Native leaders, announced that his government “will support” the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). When that announcement was made I expressed pleasure with the decision and yet urged caution until the Department of State published… more

  • Brooking No Criticism

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    Tom Goldtooth, director of the Indigenous Environmental Network and spokesman for the indigenous peoples’ caucus at the UN climate change talks last year in Copenhagen, had his credentials revoked at the UN conference in Cancun last week for publicly describing the UN gathering as  “a trade show for promoting false solutions”. Goldtooth and others were… more

  • In Order To Prevail

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    The achievement by the World Indigenous Peoples’ Movement of institutionalizing human rights for themselves in international law is an example of the power of moral sanction. While protecting their collective rights to property, governance and cultural heritage on paper is not an end, it is a means. As the indigenous nations continue their struggle to… more

  • Athabasca Showdown

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    The Firelight Group, a research cooperative, has released a report on the impacts of the Alberta Tar Sands on the Athabasca River and the indigenous communities suffering from its degradation. Contamination of the Athabasca violates Treaty 8, the Canadian Constitution, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Does this mean Canada will… more

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  • Obama Administration Endorses UNDRIP

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    President Barak Obama endorsed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples three years after the United Nations General Assembly adopted UNDRIP in September 2007 and after an extensive review by the US Department of State with Indian governments, non-governmental organizations and individuals.  The US position opposing the Declaration during the previous four US… more

  • Between Life and Death

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    Today’s essay at International Cry notes the importance of transparency, the responsibilities of media, and the value of being informed. Cataloging the escalation of atrocities committed against indigenous peoples worldwide, IC observes that media exposure of wrongdoing by governments and corporations sometimes makes the difference between life and death. As the UN and its member… more

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  • 2010 White House Tribal Nations Conference

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    It is a historic event. Alaska Native and Native American leaders will meet with President Obama at the White House Tribal Nations Conference, held at the headquarters of the Department of Interior in Washington tomorrow on Thursday Dec. 16th. The aim of the tribal summit is to promote stronger communications between tribes and the Obama… more

  • Fighting For Change

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    Calling the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples a path to respect and reconciliation, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo speaks on fighting for change. more

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  • Manifest Injustice

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    As a participant in the Modern Indian Identity series of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, Walter Echo-Hawk of the Native American Rights Fund spoke recently about the manifest injustice in the American court system, observing that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples — an instrument of… more

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  • Dirty Secrets

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    As reported by Al Jazeera, Shell Oil essentially rules the state of Nigeria. In addition to the Wikileaks release of Shell documents, The Real News Network recently held a webcast about freedom of the Internet in holding accountable all abusers of power. They also did a segment on the carbon cartel’s Copenhagen Accord, Tar Sands,… more

  • An Unseemly Tradition

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    Last month, in the runup to COP 16, the National Congress of American Indians called upon the US State Department and the UN to create a new category of Indigenous Nation Governmental Representative so US Tribal Nations will have a right to participate as governmental representatives in UN activities such as the Framework Convention on Climate Change and Permanent… more

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  • Lackey Journalism

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    Reading yesterday’s IPS report on COP 16, I am reminded of earlier conferences, where the European forces of globalization divided up other peoples’ lands by international agreement. Not having transcripts from those 16th-19th century proceedings, I can only imagine the invocation of church, state and market interests that combined in setting forth those self-congratulatory plans.… more

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  • Market-Based Climate Schemes: Rejected

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    Indigenous peoples’ representatives in Cancun, México have flatly rejected the market-based approach to global warming called REDD (United Nations Reduction of Emissions for Deforestation and Forest Degradation). Thousands of indigenous peoples’ organization members and supporters marched in Cancun in front of Moon Palace where Climate Change delegates were meeting to make the point that the… more

  • The Paradox of Participation

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    Having followed and chronicled the United Nations — in particular its conventions and other protocols affecting the extension of human rights to indigenous peoples — I think it is safe to say that the UN, like the US and other UN member states, is a paradox. As with most modern states, law, morality and money… more

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  • Friends

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    As I noted in this August 2008 testimonial, The Real News Network has broken new ground by including the indigenous perspective. As states like China and the US try to close down the free Internet, attacking whistleblowers and ransacking independent media centers, those of us working to extend democracy and human rights need news free… more

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  • Arrest Obama

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    Obama’s death squads in West Papua, the Indonesian military special forces known as Kopassus, are now targeting indigenous religious leaders for assassination. In July, Barack Obama lifted the restrictions on funding the notorious death squads responsible for innumerable murders in West Papua and East Timor. Perhaps some day international jurists will no longer turn a… more

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  • Convergence Against Corruption

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    Joshua Tree reports from Cancun, where federal police harassment of the Mayan caravan has failed to prevent indigenous leaders from mobilizing an international convergence of indigenous communities against the corruption of COP 16. more

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  • Cancun Climate: Hopeful Signs

    China and India are easing their opposition to US demands for climate compliance monitoring, reporting and verification for developing countries (a long time demand of the US government) and environmental groups like the World Wildlife Fund now say the “draft text [of the treaty] provides a good basis for negotiation.” The European Union is pushing… more

  • CWIS Associate Scholars Achieve

    The Center for World Indigenous Studies Associate Scholars Program calls upon the best and the brightest scholarly leaders worldwide who work with Fourth World Nations and will share their knowledge and perspectives for the benefit of Fourth World peoples.  The Center’s program experiences great success in large measure because of the accomplishments of the Scholars.… more

  • Front Lines

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    When the American company Bechtel tried to privatize water in Bolivia, they helped to foment an indigenous peoples’ rebellion. That rebellion, in turn, established an indigenous head of state who has led them in revising their constitution to respect the rights of Mother Earth, enabling Bolivia to act as guarantor of the implementation of the… more

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  • Positive Change

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    Ecotrust Awards will be presented in Portland Oregon today to four innovative indigenous leaders from western Canada and the US. Working in health, education, communications and political organizing, the recipients catalyze positive change within indigenous communities. Congratulations all! more

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  • Oaxaca Libre

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    The indigenous communities of Oaxaca have been engaged in a life and death struggle against a corrupt and ruthless state for decades. In the aftermath of the 2006 rebellion, native leaders that escaped assassination are cautiously optimistic that a new, more respectful relationship might be possible. more

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  • The Wrong Lesson

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    One of the myths deposed by the Wikileaks US State Department embassy cable cache is the notion of diplomacy as a benign exercise above the fray of dirty dealing that takes place at the National Security Administration or Central Intelligence Agency. With the revelation of spying on UN officials, authorized by Secretary of State Clinton,… more

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  • Muskeg Mayhem

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    Ben Powless reports from the Alberta Tar Sands, where Environment Canada’s blind faith in Canada Natural Resources Limited allowed the oil company to discharge toxic tailings onto the muskeg where First Nations hunt beaver and moose. With indigenous communities experiencing health problems from water contaminated by the oily ooze, politicians in Ottawa are scrambling to… more

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  • Oolichan, Salmon Decline and Oil

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    The “Coastal First Nations” is the name of a enormously important alliance between the Wuikinuxv Nation, Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xaixais, Nuxalk, Gitga’at, Haisla, Metlakatla, Old Masset, Skidegate and Haida nations located on the northeast Pacific Ocean along the coast of Canada and Alaska.  Formed in early 2010, the Alliance pits the resources and political will of ten… more

  • Paternalism

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    Paternalism toward indigenous peoples isn’t just a right-wing phenomenon. As left-wing publications like Mother Jones demonstrate, the ignorance and arrogance that characterizes the elite of the corporate state is pervasive in the dominant society. Writing on the upcoming UN climate change conference in Cancun, the progressive publication acts as though they never heard of indigenous… more

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  • Taxing Tribal Resources

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    States’ governments like the US, Canada and Mexico are looking for new revenue sources that can be tapped without much political blow-back from voters. Tribal natural resources and economic activities inside tribal territories are increasingly the targets of legislator seeking to prop up the sagging states’ government revenues. Tribal resources have always been extremely valuable… more

  • Friends of the Earth

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    For the indigenous peoples of Latin America, what the European introduced plague and military invasions spared from destruction since 1492 is now being annihilated by the market system. Globalization in the form of deforestation, agrochemical poisoning, and ethnic cleansing by multinational giants like Monsanto, Cargill, and ADM, now spells the end of the world for… more

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  • Intelligence Inquisition

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    Nora Barrows-Friedman and Maureen Clare Murphy report on the use of grand juries by the US Department of Justice as a tool of political repression against peace activists. In what amounts to an intelligence inquisition, says Friedman and Murphy, the Obama Administration has upped the ante against domestic critics of US policy towards Israel and… more

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  • People in a Changing World

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    How do human-environment relationships affect the reality of communities, concepts of health and well-being? This is the topic of discussions during a conference in Europe’s High North- the 7th International Kastelli Symposium, organized by Thule Institute, University of Oulu in co-operation with University of Arctic Thematic Networks on Global Change and Arctic Medicine, taking place… more

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  • Canada’s Endorsement

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    As Cultural Survival notes, Canada’s “endorsement” of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples specifically objects to most of the rights contained in the landmark international law. In plain language, Canada’s endorsement is fraudulent. In the age of public relations as a substitute for governance, Canada could take a lesson from the ultimate… more

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  • Veracity of Video

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    WITNESS blog looks at the Testify Project’s use of short video to compile testimony for submission to the UN Human Rights Council for its periodic review of the status of minorities and indigenous peoples in the United States. more

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  • Hidden History

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    Reverend Kevin Annett has had a long-running war with church and state in exposing high crimes perpetrated against Canada’s indigenous peoples. Earlier battles included losing his parish, his family, and his academic career. More recently, as he has taken his fight to the Vatican and an international tribunal over the Canadian Holocaust, Annett has lost… more

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  • Two Faced

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    As Canada announces its endorsement of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the Canadian government is simultaneously working toward the privatization of Indian Reserves, a move that Native legal scholars describe as disastrous for First Nations. Noting that the endorsement of the landmark 2007 human rights instrument is mainly symbolic, the… more

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  • Canada endorses UNDRIP; US stands alone

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    On Friday, November 12th, 2010, Canada joined Australia and New Zealand in reversing its decision to officially endorse the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). The UNDRIP, recognizing the rights of indigenous people as both individuals and as a collective, was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2007, with Canada,… more

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  • Climate of Impunity

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    In Oaxaca, a region of popular collectives and strong social movements, the Mexican military has targeted indigenous and environmental activists as enemies of the political elite. Protecting their privileges against demands by teachers and popular activism has led to what Oaxacan human rights lawyer Alba Cruz calls a climate of impunity. With 50,000 police, army,… more

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  • Caucasian Nations

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    During the summer of 1999, most Western journalists were focused on the NATO bombings in Belgrade ending the war in Kosovo, but on the other side of the Black Sea, the second war in Chechnya was beginning under a bombing campaign by the Russian Federation. While the Balkans and the Caucasus are geographically and politically… more

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  • Intercontinental Cry

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    My colleague Ahni at Intercontinental Cry recently received recognition for his work in covering the plight of indigenous peoples in Kenya that led to police reforms that toned down the violence against them. As an editor and correspondent who reads IC daily, I want to take the opportunity to congratulate Ahni for his fine work,… more

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  • Revitalizing Hostility

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    Adrienne Pine reports on the Pentagon’s Strategic Culture Initiative, a project to develop propaganda favorable to US interests in Latin America. Targeted at recent anti-imperial agreements between a majority of states in South America — particularly at the democratic independence of Bolivia — the new psychological warfare partnership with Florida International University enables the U.S.… more

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  • Sustainable Alternatives

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    The plan by Chevron and other investors to raze a quarter million acres of the Mojave for solar development illustrates the challenge of renewable energy within an unsustainable culture. Tidal, wind and solar projects elsewhere take into account environmental and indigenous resources, thereby maintaining a balance between consumption and conservation, but when market economics are… more

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  • Absence of the Sacred

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    In his book The Globalisation of Poverty, Michel Chossudovsky exposes UN agencies like the International Monetary Fund and World Bank as part of the credit cartel subverting state sovereignty and undermining indigenous autonomy. I thought about this book the other day when reading the declaration by the Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change, simultaneously noting… more

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  • Forest Rescue Fraud

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    REDD is a Ponzi scheme using the threat of climate change to rip off indigenous peoples’ resources. If the UN was genuinely concerned about humankind, it would not have silenced the indigenous delegates who traveled to Copenhagen for climate change talks. Scapegoating Indonesia is a false concern, given the major opponents of human rights for… more

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  • Nations Versus States

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    A while back, Bill Weinberg wrote that the 4th World War, characterized by NAFTA and other instruments of colonial reconquest, is an extension of previous genocides against indigenous peoples–a conflict of nations versus states. more

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  • Carving Up Canada

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    To anyone who’s paid attention, the fact that globalization is an agenda for privatizing all wealth and resources into the hands of transnational corporations is nothing new. Nor is the architecture of the privatization assault: US Aid for International Development, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank remain the heavy hitters. What is new,… more

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  • Access & Benefit: Genes

    Nagoya, Japan – The 10th Conference of Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity produced a truly wilted plan for governments, non-governmental organizations, businesses and indigenous peoples to meet the challenge of the collapsing natural system of diverse plants, animals and their eco-niches throughout the world. During a week of negotiations involving 193 states’ governments… more

  • What is knowledge?

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    This is a potent question at a time when Indigenous nations struggle to assert rights to intellectual property. But before we look at the economics and politics of knowledge in the post-colonial context, how about we examine basic assumptions. Western students very often comment: Why do Aboriginal societies restrict knowledge? My comment: What do you… more

  • Aggression Unabated

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    Minorities in Focus examines the process of genocide in West Papua, where indigenous independence and autonomy have been systematically undermined since the 1963 invasion by Indonesia. As the ethnic cleansing proceeds, the natives of the island wonder where they will go. more

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  • Achieving Coherence

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    Communications in Conflict Fighting for Our Lives Before November 30, 1999, most people in the world had no idea what the World Trade Organization (WTO) was or did. The anti-globalization special forces changed all that. N30, the Battle in Seattle, and the WTO became part of history. Had there been no special forces, however, no… more

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  • Trappings of Culture

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    In a consumer society, settler culture not only assimilates indigenous peoples into the dominant market relationships, it also assimilates the trappings of indigenous culture as yet another commodity. For those looking for meaning and purpose beyond consumption, the trappings are representative of a more authentic cosmology and philosophy, but achieving these visions entails a lot… more

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  • Pandora’s Box Reveals Identity

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    Watching the movie Avatar leads to many Indigenous perspectives on many contemporary issues, including the irony of a movie made for mass production and profits that speaks to enduring issues of colonisation, invasion, destruction of ecosystems, and disrespect to land, people, and the creatures who inhabit and make up the consciousness of a PLACE. Not… more

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  • Media Indigena

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    Media Indigena looks at the latest offerings from indigenous film. The American Indian Film Festival begins November 5 in San Francisco. more

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  • The Cultural Vortex of Modernity

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    Many commentators including Indigenous scholars have continually raised the issues that settler-invader societies in Australia, Canada, the USA, and other synthetic nation states built on the backs of native people and their lands are culturally troubled. Many have called this trouble the postmodern era, expressive of a meaningful vortex – the absence of morality, connection,… more

  • Global CBD and Climate Agreements…Impossible

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    The United Nations has been the venue for terribly important negotiations concerning biological diversity, climate change, intellectual property, and matters as disturbing as human trafficking. Despite the prodigious efforts of a great many people, negotiations in virtually every arena have failed to meet goals or expected agreements.  Perhaps 30,000 people will travel to Cancun, Mexico… more

  • Colossal Fossil

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    Continuing to obstruct indigenous human rights as it did at climate change talks in Copenhagen, the government of Canada is trying to block recognition of indigenous intellectual property in the Convention on Biological Diversity. As UN member states attempt to craft protocols for access, benefits and sharing of traditional knowledge in protecting the forests of… more

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  • MDGs

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    Millenium Development Goals in Mexico‘s three largely indigenous states of Guerrero, Oaxaca and Chiapas fall far short in health and education. The goals for development set by the UN, of course, are measured in values established by its member states, not by indigenous societies whose concept of worthwhile development is often at odds with neoliberal… more

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  • Pandering to Christian Bigotry

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    The clear message in the Five Steps to Tyranny videos is that demonization is a political tool, used by politicians to suppress dissent and subvert solidarity. Two current examples not in the series are the US Department of Justice raids last month against peace activists by the Joint Terrorism Task Force, and the recent passage… more

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  • Poverty Pimping

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    Anyone who has observed politicians and developers in action knows that the quickest way to destroy community cohesion is through programs like the war on poverty. As it and other myriad schemes by governments to use the plight of the poor to enrich themselves, the cover of moral sanctity is essential to success. On the… more

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  • A Tactic of Warfare

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    Contrary to propaganda proffered by the State Department, terrorism is not a belief system; it is, rather, a tactic of warfare. Sometimes used offensively by states in suppressing dissent or in subduing populations, sometimes used defensively by those being suppressed or subdued, terrorism is an effective means of making one’s determination known. As a systematic… more

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  • Peruvian Policy

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    Indigenous women from the district of Cuzco in the Peruvian Andes are still seeking restitution for the forced sterilization program used against them by the Peruvian government in the 1990s. As a genocidal policy of the Fujimori Administration, no progress has been made on a settlement with the 300,000 women sterilized against their will. Despite… more

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  • Red Power

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    Lorraine Jessepe interviews Madonna Thunder Hawk about the Red Power movement, a global indigenous initiative that is on the move. more

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  • Perils

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    As the United States celebrates the mass murderer known as Columbus, Rose Aguilar interviews three Native women about the perils facing American Indians today. more

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  • Storytelling for Survival

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    Storytelling in the Fourth World is a vital part of transmitting identity and creating community essential to maintaining resilient holistic cultures. Intercultural communications serve as diplomatic tools, while intracultural communications maintain group cohesion. Cooperation and adaptation depend on effective and pervasive communications responsive to new threats, challenges and opportunities. In today’s world — in addition… more

  • Human Migration

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    As one of the inevitable consequences of the global crises generated by globalization, human migration is a growing aspect of life in the 21st century. Given the projected disruptions from climate change, widescale migration is perhaps a permanent social phenomenon. At the Fourth World Social Forum on Migration held in Quito, activist scholars will discuss… more

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  • Five Hundred Years

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    The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has again ruled against the government of Mexico for abuses committed against the indigenous peoples of the State of Guerrero. As throughout the region that includes Oaxaca and Chiapas, the military and police narrative of combating drugs is mostly a cover story for preventing indigenous organizers from successfully implementing… more

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  • Outside the Realm

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    Coast Salish nations gathered recently at Swinomish to discuss action on their international effort to restore the resources of the Salish Sea. Part of their discussion with each other, as well as with representatives from the federal governments of Canada and the US, was what strategies held out the most promise of success. As one… more

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  • Determining Dialogue

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    The limited focus by the state of Chile on development dialogue for indigenous territories is disrespectful toward the inherent owners dispossessed by Chilean colonialism, and is an impediment to plurinationalism. As a signatory to ILO Convention 169, as well as to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Chilean government displays… more

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  • Scourge of the Jungle

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    In the news last week for teaming up with Chevron and the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation in support of REDD initiatives to turn indigenous peoples’ forests into corporate plantations, Shell is again in the news for developing lands stolen from Guarani Indians in order to produce biofuel in Brazil. I guess after facing worldwide condemnation… more

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  • Coca Colla

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    As California prepares to vote on the legalization of marijuana, Bolivia explores new popular uses for coca. Both demonized by US agencies profiting from police and military actions against them, these medicinal herbs have been used for thousands of years as tonics and stimulants, much like their unscathed cousins consumed at high tea. Consumed widely… more

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  • Communities Under Siege

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    In February 2010, Bety Carino, a Mixtec organizer from Oaxaca spoke at the Frontline Defenders conference in Dublin, Ireland about the aboriginal struggle against the free trade invaders in Mexico. In April 2010, Carino and Finnish human rights observer Jyri Antero Jaakkola were murdered by pro-government paramilitaries who ambushed a humanitarian peace caravan bringing food… more

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  • Killing Freedom

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    As the Mapuche political prisoner hunger strike enters the deadly phase, Dawn Paley of The Dominion documents how Canadian corporations and the World Bank have aggravated the conflict against indigenous peoples in Chile. more

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  • REDD Shell Game

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    Shell Oil denounced for undermining indigenous peoples human rights in order to profit from UN climate change protocols. Shell, Chevron, and the Clinton Foundation are funding REDD initiatives aimed at converting forests to plantations, all the while continuing to displace tribal peoples from their territories. more

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  • Shame and Derision

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    Under former president Uribe of Colombia, recently appointed by the UN to investigate Israel’s attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla, Colombia’s indigenous peoples experienced horrific atrocities. Terrorized by the Colombian state for the benefit of multinational companies after their lands and resources, Colombia’s indigenous communities have much in common with those of Palestine. As the… more

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  • Yellow Dirt

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    Laura Miller writes at Salon about the US government’s betrayal of the Navajo in order to mine, mill and dump uranium. With a lethal legacy of carcinogenic land, water and air that has yet to be resolved, Yellow Dirt is a timely and tragic tale. Intercontinental Cry features Uranium, a 1990 National Film Board of… more

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  • Fast Track Contract

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    Fast-track mining contracts in Palawan, backed by the Armed Forces of the Phillipines, may be illegal, but they are also indicative of the underlying reality obscured by UN biosphere designations, human rights declarations, and conventions on biodiversity. While these international moral sanctions and expressions of environmental sanity are right and proper, they are inadequate in… more

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  • The Meaning of Place

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    In his talk Indigenous Resurgence and Traditional Ways of Being, University of Victoria Professor Gerald Taiaiake Alfred examines the fundamental challenges facing indigenous peoples and their friends in confronting the nation-state and the corporations that fund it. Foundational to his vision of decolonization is the restoration of community through overcoming individual fear of confronting the… more

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  • Perpetuating Pinochet

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    The United Nations Human Rights Council and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights accuse the Chilean government of violating international standards of justice by its persecution of the indigenous Mapuche people in their struggle for self-determination. more

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  • Indian Fighter

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    The Dominion looks at the newly appointed Minister of Indian Affairs, John Duncan. Duncan, a former MP and long time employee of the timber industry in Canada, has a track record of aggression toward First Nations spanning decades. As several indigenous leaders recall, Duncan didn’t just help destroy their lands, he led efforts to destroy… more

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  • Escaping Education

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    In Solidarities of Resistance, The Dominion looks at the capitalist concept of education and its impact on indigenous youth in Canada. Gustavo Esteva, author of Escaping Education, notes that the separation of learning from community is intertwined with the formation of nation-states. As Squamish language instructor Dustin Rivers observes, it is time for a new… more

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  • Monoculture

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    The Ethics of Ethanol A consortium of indigenous peoples and NGOs pressures the World Bank to cease funding monoculture palm oil plantations used in ethanol production. Expansion of plantation development to meet the ethanol demand, created by the U.S. Congressional mandate, has fueled both deforestation of indigenous territories and genetically modified organism mono-cropping that drives… more

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  • Higher Education

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    Indian Country Today looks at the indigenous programs at the University of Victoria, a cutting edge institution in facilitating the indigenous perspective in higher education. more

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  • Territory of Mapuche

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    Pascual Pichun Collonao, a twenty-seven year old journalism student, is serving five years in a Chilean prison for burning a logging truck. Along with the seventy other Mapuche political prisoners incarcerated under Chile’s anti-terrorism law, Collonao is part of the indigenous movement for Mapuche self-determination under international law. As the Special Rapporteur for the UN… more

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  • Conservation versus Tourism

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    Kalahari Bushmen appeal Botswana High Court decision denying them use of wells after government evictions of the indigenous inhabitants from their homeland failed. Controlling access to groundwater has become a human rights issue in Botswana, where the President himself supports corporations seeking to hoard Kalahari water for such developments as tourism, swimming pools and diamond… more

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  • Appalling Violence

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    Disappeared in Canada Amnesty International and the Red Cross call on the Canadian government to get in line with international law as a means of protecting indigenous women from appalling violence. more

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  • Chile Today

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    Lewis and Clark Law School professor Robert J. Miller, Lisa M. Lesage, and Sebastian Lopez Escarcena examine how the Doctrine of Discovery has been incorporated into the ethnocentric policies of the Chilean state toward the indigenous peoples of Chile today. more

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  • Australia v Aborigines

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    Discrimination Down Under UN rebukes Australian government for entrenched discrimination against Aborigines, including official suspension of the racial discrimination act in order to intervene in Northern Territory indigenous communities. more

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  • Historical Ignorance

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    Amazing how little some Euro Americans understand about the indigenous population and history of the country they live in. This holds true even for those who are to closely collaborate with indigenous nations to help better the health situation of local indigenous groups. They are “inbreds” a government representative working in mental health in Olympia,… more

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  • UNITED NATIONS Press Release

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    Two UN Human Rights Experts Express Deep Concern Over Killing of Indigenous Leaders in Colombia The Special Representative of the Secretary-General on human rights defenders, Hina Jilani, and the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, Asthma Jahangir, have expressed their deep concern over the murders and disappearance… more

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  • Letters from Readers: “Killing Indians in Columbia”

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    From: Rick RozoffDate: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 06:33:10 -0700 (PDT)To: %{domain_name}Subject: Plan Colombia: A Human And Ecological Disaster HOW GLOBAL BATTLE AGAINST DRUGS RISKS BACKFIRING The international war on narcotics is going awry. Chemical spraying of coca bushes is poisoning Colombian villages. By Hugh O’Shaughnessy in Bogota Sunday June 17, 2001 The Observer Franci sits… more

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  • Letters from Readers: “Afghanistan is a “Fictive State”

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    Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2002 12:49 PMSubject: I appreciate your website Dear Mr. Rÿser and staff: It was a pleasure to visit the CWIS homepage for the first time today. I appreciated reading your column about Afghanistan in the Sept. edition of Fourth World Eye, and will continue to explore your site. I thought I… more

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  • Biodiversity Convention Threatens Fourth World Nations with Extinction

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    July 1999 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. Environmental organizations and activists originated it. The United Nations Environmental Program expedited it. States’ governments ratified it. Corporations profit from it. Fourth World nations, their cultures and their very existence are being destroyed by it. It is the Convention on Biodiversity initialed in 1992 and ratified by virtually… more

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  • “Fairy Forts” and the World Congress in Dublin Two years after concluding the World Congress on Violence an Human Coexistence, CWIS Chair Rudolph Rÿser reflects on the Gaelic Nation.

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    October 1999 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. Culdaf, County Donegal, Ireland Aug 27, 1997 — As I look out on the North Atlantic from the tip of the Inoshowan Peninsula in the village of Culdaf I am sitting at a third floor window of the Culdaf House, a 350 year hold farmhouse built by an… more

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  • Russia’s “Recollapse” – Chechnya’s Independence: The lesson of Somalia

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    January 2000 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. The Russian Federation is broken. It is unable to function as a state according to the ordinary terms that define an internationally recognized state. Like Burma (Myanmar), Haiti, Colombia, Congo, Honduras, Indonesia, Bangladesh, North Korea, Afghanistan, Rwanda, Burundi, the Sudan and Somalia the Russian Federation is incapable of… more

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  • Peaceful Warriors Passing Through

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    December 2000 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. In January and then April of 200 two of the finest people it has ever been my pleasure to know died at the early ages of 58, 62, a time in one’s life much too early to leave. Dr. Bernard Q. Nietschmann, a Miskito and defender of the… more

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  • Killing Indians in Colombia

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    March 2001 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. Replaying the war in Nicaragua, El Salvador only Communism is now Cocaine Indian peoples face “culturocide,” (the killing of a culture) in the bankrupt state of Colombia. This tyranny against Fourth World peoples is not the result only of Colombian social policy. The killing of Colombia’s Fourth World… more

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  • States Must Now Put in Place a Fourth World Policy

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    September 2001 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. Counterfeit Islam Stalking with Terror and Fourth World nations are in the Crossfire Officials of States’ governments, particularly those that are rushing to engage the New World War declared by US President George Bush should stop for a minute and think. States must recognize that they are entering… more

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  • Afghanistan is a “Fictive State”

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    Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2002 12:49 PMSubject: I appreciate your website Dear Mr. Rÿser and staff: It was a pleasure to visit the CWIS homepage for the first time today. I appreciated reading your column about Afghanistan in the Sept. edition of Fourth World Eye, and will continue to explore your site. I thought I… more

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  • Yakama Cultural Leader Wins Beeson Peace Award

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    November 2002 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, PhD It is rare that the achievements of indigenous leaders are recognized for their importance to humanity by organizations of metropolitan societies, but when they do it is worth congratulating them as well as the person recognized. Yakama nation cultural leader Russell Jim has been presented with the coveted… more

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  • Samoa’s “Mamala Tree Agreement” Promotes Profit Not Healing

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    November 2004 by Rudolph C. Rÿser, Ph.D. Olympia, Washington, USA 5 October 2004 — The Mamala Tree Agreement concluded between the University of California-Berkeley and the Samoan government is destined to falter and breakdown when it becomes clear that the keepers of Samoan knowledge are the proper authorities over the use of traditional medicines and… more

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  • AWAN

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    Aboriginal Women’s Action Network takes on colonization, prostitution, and violence against indigenous women in Canada. more

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  • Honorable Experience

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    Three years ago this week, I began as a correspondent to Fourth World Eye, a natural outcome of my archival work for Public Good Project and my posting on its blog Continuity that I’d started working on a year earlier. I first met Joe DelaCruz and Rudolph Rÿser in 1996 at a conference the Center… more

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  • Development Aggression

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    Yesterday’s article in The Dominion about debt forgiveness for the Democratic Republic of the Congo reminded me of a recent message by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, which stated that development aggression is one of the greatest threats to the survival of indigenous peoples. In The Dominion, it is noted that the IMF… more

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  • Damned by Dams

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    In its latest report, Serious Damage: Tribal Peoples and Large Dams, Survival International examines the building boom on indigenous lands financed by the World Bank, European Investment Bank, and states like The Peoples Republic of China. Constructed for the benefit of corporations cashing in on biofuel, mining, and deforestation for export to consumer economies, the… more

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  • Assets of Humanity

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    Socially responsible investment companies urge US government to adopt and implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Citing the relationship between sustainable economic development and human rights for indigenous peoples, the financial asset management firms noted that corporations doing business in tribal territories will follow the government’s lead. more

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  • REDD and Autonomy

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    The United Nations has been sponsoring negotiations for the last several years on REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries). Indigenous peoples and their organizations concerned with Climate Change and international negotiations of a new Climate Change Treaty to replace the Kyoto Protocols have been slowly evolving international capabilities to establish… more

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  • Whose Government

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    This week in Bonn, indigenous representatives discussed problems with REDD, the UN program to address climate change. As the indigenous delegates made clear, the main problem remains governance, more specifically, whose government — modern states or First Nations — will decide how to treat resources on indigenous lands. more

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  • Diabetes Epidemic

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    When it comes to diabetes, indigenous communities suffer disproportionately. Some of this is due to dietary changes forced on them by industrial societies, but according to The Dominion’s John Schertow, it may have more to do with pollutants. Given the number of pollution–related health problems from industrial practices on indigenous lands, this growing health crisis… more

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  • Medicine and Knowledge

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    CWIS Chair Rudolph Rÿser and CWIS associate scholar Anke Weisheit are scheduled to present at the 4th Global Summit on HIV/AIDS, Traditional Medicine, and Indigenous Knowledge, August 2-5, at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. more

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  • The Tarnished Past

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    The Ayacucho survivors of Peru‘s 20-year war against indigenous peoples still wait for reparations promised but delayed. In what amounts to around $100 for families of victims murdered by police and military death squads, the Quechua-speaking people from whence The Shining Path rose up against globalization, can expect little from a president who only last… more

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  • Trial in Guatemala

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    State Secrets Archives in Guatemala lead to trial of former police, as well as further investigations into atrocities against the indigenous Maya by the Guatemalan army. more

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  • Free Expression

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    As a result of institutionalizing indigenous human rights, indigenous-produced media in South America makes significant advances, while their North American cousins still languish in 20th century models imposed by markets and states. more

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  • The Right to Communicate

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    One of the things readily apparent to me now that I am limited to slow DSL service is that some video on the Internet plays well while most are inaccessible. Something for my colleagues to keep in mind when designing studios and communications projects for global indigenous audiences. My situation is partly financial, and partly… more

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  • Seeing Clearly

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    As one of the language groups of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Chinookan is also the source for the name of one of my weblogs. Skookum: strong, stout, brave; fine, splendid–is also a commonly used term in the Pacific Northwest for something well done, be it a work of art, craft,… more

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  • Fourth World Ambience

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    While the Fourth World is popularly perceived as pastoral and nomadic hunter-gatherers, Fourth World political entities are also comprised of modern indigenous economies, still governed by the law of generosity. Generosity being the essential attitude that generates Fourth World cultural ambience, the abiding principles of Fourth World societies are conservation, cooperation and reciprocity. As such,… more

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  • In the News

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    At the IUHPE 2010 world conference on health promotion last week, CWIS fellow Mirjam Hirch presented a paper on traditional knowledge and self-determination in indigenous mental health. In 2009, at the Traditional Medicine conference in Peru, Ms. Hirch presented on the topic of the revitalization of culture and traditional medicine to cure mental illness in… more

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  • WHO Admits to Not Have Done Enough

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    “I hope this is a start of getting into a more intense contact,” the representative of the World Health Organization stated at the organization’s Geneva headquarters during a meeting with indigenous delegates from around the world on July 14th. ” You have to come see us, speak to us,” he admonished. “It is a two… more

  • Six Nations

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    Tutoring Obama The Obama Administration is the first presidency to deny the right of travel to members of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. As the six nations that tutored the founders of the United States on democratic governance, the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) have maintained their independence, including the right to issue their own passports. Now, it seems, as… more

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  • Sharing Narratives for Better Health

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    There is lots of power in indigenous knowledge holders coming together at international venues such as the conference on health promotion IUHPE currently taking place at Geneva. While in 2004 indigenous representatives still were not truly taking part in this important event, nowadays, after lots of indigenous lobbying there are many indigenous oral presentation sessions,… more

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  • Global Health Promotion

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    The world is in the midst of a multiplicity of crisis, above all a `crisis of ideas.` We need a paradigmatic shift, an overall economic change, Dr. Sara Cook, Director, UN Research Institute for Social Development strongly emphasized in today`s opening keynote address at the 20th triennial World Conference of the International Union for Health… more

  • Global AIDS Summit

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    Dr. Rudolph Rÿser, CWIS Board Chairman, has accepted an invitation to deliver an address at the 4th Annual Global Summit on HIV/AIDS, Traditional Medicine and Indigenous Knowledge, 2-5 August 2010, at the University of Cape Coast in Ghana. His presentation, Implementing Traditional Healing Practices and Indigenous Knowledge through Internationally Agreed Instruments, will speak to the… more

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  • Symbiosis

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    In covering the wild salmon campaign on Vancouver Island, Kim Petersen notes that while Norway adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Norwegian corporations farming salmon in British Columbia are destroying the wild runs symbiotic with the First Nations there. Although many tribes have taken the path of litigation, other indigenous bands… more

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  • Biodiesel Blues

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    The Constitutional Court of Colombia will soon sentence investors, paramilitary, and army members involved in arson and murder of indigenous peoples in order to establish a biodiesel refinery and plantation on their land. Meanwhile, the Colombian Interior Ministry remains hostile to observance of international law respecting indigenous rights. Resolution of the longstanding dispute between the… more

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  • The Terms of Terror

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    A San Francisco Bay Area research group is handling the digitization and organization of the Guatemalan National Police archives recently discovered in a building in Guatemala City. As a repository of information, including the notorious death squads that plagued the indigenous Maya over a 36-year protracted struggle against the Guatemalan oligarchy, the archive might shine… more

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  • The Niger Delta

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    Ogoni Oil The Niger Delta, home to 31 million people and one of the most important wetlands in the world, is also one of the most oil-polluted sites on Earth. Caught between callous oil companies and crooked bureaucracies, the indigenous Ogoni reap all the harm and none of the benefits. Watching their environment and livelihoods… more

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  • Surviving Guatemala

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    Despite the favorable response by the Guatemalan government to an order by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, indigenous peoples there fear reprisal. more

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  • US in Docket

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    The Southwest Tribal Summit, organized by the San Carlos Apache, has issued a report to the UN Human Rights Council documenting violations by the US Government. In the 125 page report, the indigenous nations at the summit took particular note of the degradation of their natural resources by corporations the federal government exempts from laws… more

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  • Contesting Canada

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    In its coverage of the G20 Summit in Toronto, The Guardian notes that coercing consensus is an oxymoron, and that by contesting the legitimacy of Canada, indigenous activists comprise an antithesis to the global elite. As Canada pursues a new era of resource colonisation against the backdrop of cultural genocide, the indigenous resurgence is proving… more

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  • Due Diligence

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    Among all the horrors that afflict indigenous communities worldwide, the trafficking of women and children for the business of sexual exploitation (prostitution) has to be one of the worst. While this oppression is not limited to indigenous societies, they are particularly vulnerable as their cultures collapse due to the effects of such things as colonization,… more

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  • International Obligations

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    Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo says the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a standard of achievement to be pursued in a spirit of partnership and mutual respect. As an international human rights instrument, UNDRIP, says Atleo, sets standards that can increase the collective strength of indigenous nations throughout… more

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  • Traditional Governance

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    The Canadian government has launched an attack on the Algonquin. Invoking a law last used eighty-six years ago against the Haudenosaunee, Ottawa is determined to eliminate traditional governance, which poses an obstacle to state-supported industrial projects in unceded indigenous territories. more

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  • Dumping Waste & Pollutants

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    New York Times columnist Frank Rich wrote,  “If Americans abhor poorly regulated deep-water oil drilling, wait until they get a load of nuclear waste on land with no regulatory agency in charge at all.” (Sunday, 20 June 2010, “Clean the Gulf, Clean House, Clean Their Clock”) While Rich was mainly concerned with motivating the Barak… more

  • A Fighting Spirit

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    The Dominion‘s Dawn Paley looks at the fighting spirit of grassroots indigenous activism, and the potential for the anti-globalization movement to benefit from mutual effort. more

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  • Living Well

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    Ben Powless, secretary for the Indigenous Peoples Working Group at Cochabamba, and organizer Kimia Ghomeishi report that the participants in the World Peoples Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth are determined to return to the principles of living well — free of contamination and genetic modification — and are committed to… more

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  • Invading Inuit

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    The Arctic development plan is part of an ongoing psychotic initiative led by the G8/G20 nations to exploit the world’s last remaining pristine ecosystems for energy and raw resources. — Clayton Thomas-Muller, Indigenous Environmental Network The Dominion continues its coverage of the industrialization of the Arctic and its impact on the Inuit. Intercontinental Cry follows… more

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  • Tilt and Wobble

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    I’ve often remarked that indigenous connections with landscape reflect a continuity of both location and observance recorded in aboriginal memory systems. Reading Sahara: A Natural History by Marq de Villiers and Sheila Hirtle, I am struck by how little understanding we display today of the vacillations of landscape associated with long atmospheric cycles, erratic orbits,… more

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  • Anke Weisheit

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    If you think food, medicine, and indigenous knowledge are serious subjects, then you might be interested in the work of CWIS Associate Scholar, Anke Weisheit. Anke is clearly someone who makes things happen. more

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  • All That Glitters

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    Barrick Gold, the largest mining company in the world, is the subject of a new report by Amnesty International. Implicated in generating police brutality against indigenous inhabitants of Papua New Guinea, Barrick was also the subject of a book about state and corporate abuse of human rights in Africa. As a Canadian corporation, Barrick is… more

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  • Say What?

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    Canada’s Forked Tongue Amnesty International joins the Assembly of First Nations in bringing the Canadian government before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. Canada, which currently discriminates against Indian children in providing social services, claims it does not violate their human rights to receive 20% less per child than non-indigenous children. more

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  • United Nations’ SBSTTA Cautions Synthetic Bacteria, Geoengineering Research and Use

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    In lieu of the latest developments in self-replicating synthetic bacteria cell production at the J. Craig Venter Institute and Silver Lining’s Cloud Whitening Technology development, the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA) expressed concern and urged caution in the use of these new technologies at a recent meeting in Nairobi. Many of… more

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  • Everyday Occurrence

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    As noted at Harper’s, the BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico is an everyday occurrence in the Niger Delta, where indigenous inhabitants cannot fish, farm, or breathe as a result of toxic dumping by Shell and BP. more

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  • Johnny Moses

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    Johnny Moses is a unique Native American storyteller. Raised by his grandparents in a remote village on Vancouver Island, Moses is fluent in eight indigenous languages, and has been recognized as a spiritual ambassador bringing aboriginal knowledge and perspective to non-indigenous audiences. more

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  • Batwa

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    Batwa are the first peoples of Central Africa, and Batwa women are experiencing high levels of violence, as well as low levels of educational opportunity. Minority Rights Group International looks at the reasons why. more

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  • A Collective Existence

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    Becoming Human In February 2001, Dr. Rudolph C. Rÿser and guests spoke at the University of Washington about the history of human rights and its application to indigenous peoples. more

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  • Unrealized Dreams

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    As Tom Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network observes, leadership on protecting Mother Earth is emerging from indigenous communities and their movement associates in civil society. Opposed to this movement is the United Nations, its member states, and the transnational corporations engaged in corrupting them. What Tom has not discussed, are the transitional steps required… more

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  • Argentina

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    A Multinational State As Argentina prepares to celebrate its independence from Spain, indigenous nations there are mobilizing cross-country tours to promote a multinational state. Along with supportive social organizations, they are demanding that Argentina fund pro-indigenous policies that will protect their languages and resources. more

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  • The Role of Tribalism

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    Recent op-eds in the progressive press on tribalism and indigeneity reveal ongoing misperceptions. Perhaps this brief discussion on the role of tribalism in the world today will help. more

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  • Harmonious Ends

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    The metaphor of a collision course could be improved on. The capitalist system has been devouring the natural order for centuries; the human and environmental disaster is not something over the horizon. More importantly, the only alternative social system with a track record of success in achieving harmonious or holistic ends preceded capitalism by thousands… more

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  • Investigating Discovery

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    A groundbreaking report examining the roots of Christian domination over indigenous peoples and their lands was released this week at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. The report is a first step in investigating the global scope of the Doctrine of Discovery as a key source of violations of human rights of Native… more

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  • The Natural Order

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    In Cut Stones and Crossroads: A Journey in the Two Worlds of Peru, Ronald Wright encounters such literary figures as Waman Puma, an Inca philosopher from the 1600s, whose writings described the collapse of Inca society as the “world in reverse”, the Conquest as a ghastly cosmic mistake–a reversal of the natural order, which had… more

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  • UNDRIP Implementation

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    UN Headquarters, United Nations. New York City I am sitting in on a side event preparatory to the afternoon meeting of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.  The Side Event, and there are many such meetings going on simultaneously, is a special meeting set up by an organization or group of organizations to… more

  • Australia, New Zealand and now US?

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    I am today attending the 9th Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at the UN Headquarters in New York City.  It appears this session promises to have some important influences on the directions of states’ government policies. When the UN General Assembly considered the final draft of the UN Declaration on the… more

  • Remedying Injustice

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    In a recent communication about the UN protocols on climate change, Indigenous leaders observed that the process promoted by UN member states is designed to marginalize and wear down tribal participants who lack the resources to attend the multitude of meetings around the globe, let alone respond constructively to the complexities constructed by states to… more

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  • The Dragon of the Aeta and Ilongot

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    A “new” species was confirmed by biologists. Known and eaten by the indigenous nations of the Phillippines, Aeta and Ilongot, for a long time. The animal recently in the spotlight of scientific attention (Biology Letters a journal of the Royal Society) is one of only three frugivorous monitor lizards in the world, closely related to… more

  • Checking In

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    The Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study plans to take a look at how indigenous people in Canada’s cities are doing, and where they’re heading. As over half the native population of Canada, that might mean something. more

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  • Battles in Seattles

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    Last fall, on the tenth anniversary of the Battle in Seattle, many journalists explored the meaning of the event commemorating the democratic uprising against global privatization. Perhaps unmentioned during this celebration was the 1st Battle in Seattle, otherwise known as the Puget Sound Indian War, which took place between indigenous tribes like the Muckleshoot and… more

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  • Defending Aboriginal Title

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    Coastal First Nations, a partnership of indigenous communities in British Columbia, takes a collaborative and strategic approach to defending aboriginal title and resources in their traditional territories. more

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  • Canada and its “recognition” of the UNDRIP

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    The 2010 Federal Throne Speech of the Canadian government hinted at a shift in Canada’s position on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). It reads: “We are a country with an Aboriginal heritage. A growing number of states have given qualified recognition to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights… more

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  • Remarks offered at Diabetes, Holistic Gathering

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    For many years the Center for World Indigenous Studies has pioneered education, research and public policy concerning the restoration of native foods and medicines as a part of a wider program to strengthen tribal culture while reducing and eliminating chronic disease.  A large gathering at the Tulalip Tribes in March proved the wisdom of our… more

  • Restitution

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    Reviving Our Culture, Mapping Our Future, a film about a gathering of indigenous leaders from South Africa, Russia, and the Amazon, offers a road map for restitution. more

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  • Coming Together

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    I was just reading a casual exchange between some British and Portuguese bloggers, and they mentioned how every town and village in their respective countries has citizen’s advice centres, where for free people can get help in dealing with government agencies, utilities providers, landlords, and other aspects of life. All done by volunteers with special… more

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  • Lives at Risk

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    Amazonia for Sale, the online film from Peru, documents the fight of the Awajun and Wampis to defend their territory from the Peruvian government and mining companies. Using Internet videography, the indigenous of the Amazon make a compelling case against transnational corporations violating international law within their ancestral territories. With help from supporters worldwide, they… more

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  • Silk Route Journey

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    Mirjam Hirch, in her 2005 essay Tajik and Turkmen Traditions of Health in Uzbekistan, describes the distinct tribal identities within the fabricated states of Central Asia, and how the suppressed customs, traditions, and religion hold the key to the indigenous peoples’ recovery from disease. As a chronicle of history of the region, relayed through the… more

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  • WorldFocus Interview with CWIS

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    Be sure to check out WorldFocus‘ interview with Renee Davis and Tiffany Waters of CWIS about the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the global indigenous movement. It’s part of their ongoing series on indigenous cultures. Read the interview below. more

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  • War in the Andes

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    From 1980-2000, the government of Peru fought a civil war against indigenous guerrilla fighters in the Andes mountains. Last year, the Peruvian government fought to a standstill with the indigenous communities over the right of indigenous peoples to determine their own future under international law. The Peruvian state now plans to expedite dam and mining… more

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  • Identity, prejudice and healing

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    The work of Professor Judy Atkinson in Australia has moved forward a scholarship and practice around what she has called ‘educaring’ as a distinctly Indigenous approach to what may be thought of as a combination of education, therapy, counselling, and community-based social work. The latter constructs are easily identified from mainstream systems that have evolved… more

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  • A Racial Framework

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    International conventions and domestic legal prohibitions against discrimination based on perceived racial difference are arguably useful tools in promoting equality, even if academia and the moral theatrics industry sometimes mischaracterize social conflict within a racial framework. The danger comes when this mischaracterization leads policy makers and activists to believe that oppressive relationships like those between… more

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  • US Human Rights Record

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    The United Nations Human Rights Council is accepting testimony pursuant to a review of the human rights record of the United States. Indigenous peoples, governments and organizations are encouraged to submit information. more

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  • What Have They Gained?

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    As Zoe Blunt observes in The Dominion, colonial relationships between Canada and its First Nations are exacerbated by projects like the Vancouver Olympics. Desperate for funding to meet basic needs, band councils can always be found to support provincial and federal developments for a promise of financial assistance. But if the developments destroy what the… more

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  • A Sorry Saga or a First Step?

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    An article recently surfaced in Indian Country Today entitled “A Sorry Saga,” in which the author brings attention to the Native American Apology Resolution signed by President Obama on December 19th, as part of a defense appropriation spending bill. While the Resolution had passed as a stand-alone piece of legislation in the Senate, it was… more

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  • CWIS Notes

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    Center for World Indigenous Studies Fellow Mirjam Hirch has been accepted to present a guided poster presentation at the 20th International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) World Conference in Geneva, Switzerland from July 11-15. CWIS Chair Rudolph Rÿser has been nominated for an appointment to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues… more

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  • Complexity and the State of the UNFCCC Climate Talks

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    Since the tumultuous negotiations surrounding the development of the Copenhagen Accord last December, many have started to question the efficacy of the UNFCCC process of coming to a global consensus on climate change. This increased when only 55 countries submitted their reduction goals according to the Accord on the assigned deadline on Jan. 31. 139… more

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  • Why Do Some Countries Adopt International Protocols and Scientific Recommendations Quicker than Others?

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    An article in Resilience Science asks the question “Why do some countries adopt the Kyoto Protocol and IPCC recommendations earlier than others?” The COMPON project (Comparing Climate Change Policy Networks) developed cross-national surveys to try to explain this seemingly elusive inconsistency. The article details their methods (which include great generalizations and dividing up countries according to their level of… more

    Posted in Environment by 1 Comment
  • Insidious Goals

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    In February 2001, Yakama Indian Nation cultural leader and CWIS Board Member Russell Jim spoke about the insidious goals of the US government toward the indigenous peoples of the world, including the Nuclear Attack on the Yakama Culture by the atomic energy industry. more

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  • Welcome Contributors Waters and Davis

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    I wish to let all of our readers know that two new contributors have now been added to the Fourth World Eye roster. Tiffany Waters, Deputy Director and Research Associate at the Center for World Indigenous Studies will now add her insights, observations and analysis to these pages.  Renee Davis, Research Associate at the Center… more

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  • Seeking Due Process

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    The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has agreed to hear a land claim petition from First Nations on Vancouver Island. Seeking due process in the international arena, after frustrated attempts to negotiate with the governments of Canada and British Columbia, will likely reveal Canada’s standing in the Organization of American States as a result of… more

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  • Miquel Alfonso Martinez – Diplomat and Friend

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    After losing one friend it appears I have lost yet another.  Dr. Miquel J. Alfonso Martinez, one Cuba’s most outstanding diplomats who in my experience played a dominant role in the development of the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations (as one of its active members). Alfonso had been, as he told me, a… more

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  • Papuan Viktor Kaisiepo

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    Viktor Kaisiepo, died on Sunday 31 January 2010 at the age of 61. A Papuan nationalist who vigorously represented his own tribal community as well as the hundreds of communities in West Papua to preserve their right to self-determination from control by Indonesia. Viktor’s work was not finished. Viktor and I first met in Amsterdam… more

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  • Pashtunistan the Country–Security Lessons

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    Afghanistan and Pakistan stand as two semi-organized states with Pashtunistan and other nations astride their mid-sections. Violently attacked by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in the 1980s, undermined by the United States government that busily supported and financed the rise of the Taliban in its opposition to the USSR, viciously attacked by the Taliban… more

  • Until We Try

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    Truth commissions, be they in South Africa, Canada, or Guatemala, are fraught with difficulties, as emotional traumas and crimes against humanity are exposed and examined in public. Asymmetrical power — as both the root cause of atrocities and the source of distrust in reconciliation — is never more evident than when the most vulnerable accuse… more

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  • Worse Than You Think

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    Here’s some new background on the Reverend Annett assault in Vancouver, mentioned in the earlier post Stolen Lives. While he has been vilified by church and state officials for exposing past abuses of Indian children in church-run, government residential schools, it is likely his current expose of prostitution and pedophile rings protected by Vancouver police… more

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  • Democratizing Power

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    In his clip, Arthur Manuel addresses how non-native supporters of the indigenous peoples’ movement can help prevent violence against indigenous activists, as well as promote the indigenous agenda in dominant society institutions. This strategy reflects what Joseph Dore remarked about us all being in this together. For examples of how an indigenous political struggle made… more

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  • Level 47

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    Defenders of the Land: a network of Indigenous communities and activists in land struggle across Canada. Maintaining the flow of life. more

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  • Hillary AID

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    Who says (Secretary of State) Hillary lacks a sense of humor? In her recent speech, she lauded the prospects for world peace through expansion of US AID. No doubt the Bolivian people would find that highly amusing, after US AID funneled millions to the fascist landed aristocracy there to use in attempting to overthrow the… more

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  • Carbon Colonialism

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    Neither human rights language nor the rights of indigenous peoples were recognized in the [Copenhagen] Accord. This will lead to further human rights violations, climate destruction, loss of land and disruption of the livelihood and well-being of indigenous communities from the Arctic to the global south. –Tom Goldtooth, Indigenous Environmental Network more

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  • Multidimensional Vision

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    What a flat-out anti-war message. The science fiction epic film “Avatar” is a fictional story about the most pressing, real problems of today’s imperialistic world. It concerns big contemporary topics such as the human fight for natural resources, loss of culture and biodiversity, greed and inhumanity. The film is set on Pandora, a distant moon… more

  • How It Is Done

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    Given the repeated failure of corporate states to effectively deal with issues of major import like climate change, the proposal to shift leadership on climate adaptation to stateless nations merits serious consideration. As governing entities with a history spanning thousands rather than hundreds of years, they have had more time to reflect on effective governance… more

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  • Protocols of UNDRIP

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    In response to a threat by the Asian Development Bank and Nepalese government to displace them for a water project, the Hyolmo indigenous people of central Nepal have made a video documentary explaining their legal rights to Kathmandu. more

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  • Breathless Buffoonery

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    As the progressives’ avant garde, futurists like Sara Robinson supply expertise in superficial semantics. In the leadup to Copenhagen, Ms. Robinson not only predicted the planetary prognosis, but also rewrote the past. All in a swoop, she asserts our carbon society has been cranking for 2,500 years and is thus the basis of all civilized… more

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  • Living on the Land

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    Nowhere Here in the Middle Indigenous living on the land in the Northern Territory of Australia is currently threatened by an international radioactive waste dump proposal pushed by the Australian government onto Aboriginal communities. Reminiscent of what happened to the Yakama Indian Nation in Washington state, United States of America, Muckaty Station could be the… more

  • Quakers Renounce Doctrine

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    The Quakers join the Episcopalians in renouncing the Doctrine of Discovery, the 16th century principle of international law that sanctioned genocide of indigenous peoples. As the legal tool that justified European colonialism, the doctrine underlies present day state boundaries, as well as most claims and counterclaims to land and resources in much of the world.… more

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  • Abolishing Free Trade

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    Guatemalan indigenous peasants equate free trade with persecution and poverty. They are hoping climate change discussions between indigenous and industrial societies in the US, EU, and UN will lead to abolishing free trade. more

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  • North-South Climate Debate and IPs

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    Thirty years ago the United Nations was at the center of what was called the “North-South Debate.” The so-called poor countries and rich countries wrestled over demands by poor countries for rich countries to send some of their wealth to help them with economic struggles and environmental degradation. The poor countries (mostly former colonies of… more

  • In the Native Way

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    Watching Indigenous Environmental Network director Tom Goldtooth sing a cleansing ceremony song to the UN delegates in Copenhagen today reminded me of an article Tom wrote in 2001 about the native way of keeping spirituality in his work and relations. more

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  • Nuu Chah Nulth Fish

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    A few years before we moved from Bellingham, Washington to San Francisco in the late 1990s, we took a trip to the remote fishing village of Tofino on Vancouver Island’s west coast. Nearby, in the heart of Nuu Chah Nulth First Nation, is the now famous Clayoquot Sound, where Indians and environmental activists together saved… more

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  • Transforming the Settler State

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    Native feminist and UC professor Andrea Smith discusses sovereignty, indigenous nationhood, and transforming the settler-state. In her videotaped presentation, Professor Smith examines the logic of sexual violence at the root of colonialism and the nation-state, as well as the multiple logics of white supremacy. more

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  • Climate Caravan to Copenhagen

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    Strong fighters for social and climate justice travelled through Frankfurt today on a caravan that is driving from Geneva to Copenhagen, December 3-9. Politically aware people from around the world are aiming at mobilizing others to help in the struggle against the negative effects of “(green) capitalism” as well as the annihilation of indigenous peoples… more

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  • Reawakening

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    As government delegates from around the world gather next week in Copenhagen for UN climate change talks, they will be greeted by an Indigenous peoples film festival, comprising a collection of videos on what is happening to them as a result of carbon-consuming societies. more

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  • Dying For Money in Peru’s Jungle

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    Suffering, in real danger of being wiped out from a hepatitis B infection is the indigenous nation of the Candoshi, estimated at 2,500, in Peru’s northern Amazon jungle. After Candoshi chief Venancio Ucama Simon’s dramatical call on the government, Health Minister Oscar Ugarte declared a health emergency in the area to tackle the hepatitis B… more

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  • Kinder Gentler Theft

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    After inviting foreign corporations to steal Mapuche lands with the support of army and police, the government of Chile has offered to give the Mapuche some subsistence plots if they will surrender their rights under international law. Facing increased international criticism for using anti-terrorism laws against indigenous activists, Chile has apparently opted for the US/Canadian… more

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  • Hlib Jiangl Naox Niex

    Hlib Jiangl Naox Niex Amy Eisenberg, Ph.D. Sonoma County Indian Health Project dramyeis@yahoo.com Photography by John Amato, RN Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital ICU jamato8@yahoo.com http://www.pbase.com/jamato8/hmong_new_year_celebration_guizhou_province_china_2005_2006_ While serving as an International Expert in Hunan Province of southwest China at the Research Institute of Anthropology and Ethnology, Jishou University in impoverished Xiangxi Autonomous Minority Prefecture, Maid Wux,… more

  • The Pursuit of Progress

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    A recurring tool of justification for making war on third and fourth world societies is the promotion of backward practices of tribal peoples toward women. Sometimes the assertions are true, sometimes they are not, but mostly they reflect an arrogance of the first world based largely on ignorance of either history or politics. At worst,… more

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  • Maoris in Europe

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    Te Ata Tino Toa Te Ata Tino Toa, a Maori activist collective, is sponsoring a Social and Climate Justice Caravan to drive from Geneva to Copenhagen, December 3-9. Aimed at promoting awareness of the annihilation of indigenous peoples through globalization, Free Trade and market-based solutions to climate change, the caravan will stop in cities like… more

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  • Countdown to Copenhagen: Adapt or Perish

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    Changes in plant and animal life, topography, glaciers, oxygen levels in the ocean, extreme changes in the weather and changes in human health can either be a product of human activity affects (CO2 and other greenhouse gases for example or they can be just a part of the grand cycle of earth changes.  Either way,… more

  • Application to Destroy

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    In uncharacteristically forthright language, a German mining corporation has applied to the Australian Department of Indigenous Affairs for approval to destroy aboriginal sacred sites and archeological artifacts of the Nyoongar people. Petroglyphs, ancient shelters and ceremonial grounds, pure streams, and dreaming sites are some of the cultural items slated for destruction by the cement manufacturer.… more

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  • Turkey steps cautiously toward Kurds

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    Fifteen percent of the people located inside Turkish-claimed territory are Kurds.  The Kurdish people actually live in a territory interrupted by the borders of five different countries: Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Iran and Armenia. Maimed, maligned, and marginalized for generations the Kurdish peoples have steadfastly maintained their social, economic, political and cultural identity as a people… more

  • Gaining Respect

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    In some indigenous societies, the combination of colonial economic, political and religious philosophies has perverted aboriginal governance and culture in misogynist ways. In Paraguay, overcoming gender discrimination hasn’t been easy, but some of the indigenous women there are finally gaining the respect they deserve. more

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  • China’s Wild West Force in East Turkistan

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    Uyghurs are a distinct people with their territories claimed by the Peoples’ Republic of China. They are largely practicing Muslims and speak their own language. For more than sixty years the Uyghurs have agitated against the growing domination of their territory by Han-the majority population in China. The Chinese government enforces school instruction in Mandarin… more

  • Somewhere to Belong

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    There was a time in human history when political leaders attained such positions by proving themselves devoted to the protection and well-being of their people. One of my ancestors, Hugh O’Neill, was recognized as such on an Irish postage stamp. Four hundred years later, of course, the industrialization of politics – from parties to lobbyists… more

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  • Chickens Home to Roost: The Climate is most Foul

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    “If we don’t take urgent and ambitious action, the reality is that some small island developing states will not be around within a couple of decades – certainly not by the end of the century.” So spoke Barbados Delegate to the climate change preparatory talks Selwin Hart expressing the frustration of island states’, developing states,… more

  • Barcelona Climate Talks Stalling

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    Nearly every month since September 2008 when states’ governments met in Bali to set the schedule for reaching a Climate Change Treaty agreement by 2009 representatives of states, corporations, non-governmental organizations and indigenous peoples have been meeting for two-week periods to prepare language for the new treaty.  Things are not going well. First, in Bali,… more

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  • Authentic Culture

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    Life in the Andes As celebrations of indigenous life like those in the Andes last week remind us, globalized privatization — a process that began 500 years ago — is anathema to sustaining authentic culture, as well as ecosystems. As industrialized countries fall apart, organic philosophies are required to mend our psyches, as well as… more

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  • The Great Rift

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    A Thousand Suns: food, ecology, and religions in the 21st century explores the conflict between corporate Christianity and indigenous peoples in the African Rift Valley, where humankind began. more

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  • Calamity of Climate Change

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    Chamber Mindset Readers might recall the US Chamber of Commerce has been a steadfast opponent of international human rights. In the case of climate change impacts on indigenous peoples, these two issues converge. The Chamber mindset, as such, is consistent with the attitudes that prevailed regarding the U.S. Constitution prior to amendments outlawing slavery and… more

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  • Ecosystems and human culture key to GHG Cleanup

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    Let’s face it. The industrial age over the last few one hundred years has created a global mess of the environment including the air, water, land and fish and wildlife. Instead of cleaning up the mess the “business as usual” people have simply said, “Eh, leave it for the next generation to clean up.”  That… more

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  • Way of Life

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    Corpulence and Carbon No surprise that the statistics show rich consumer populations contribute far more to climate change than poor, low carbon producing societies. Kind of turns the population growth scapegoating on its head though. Of course, indigenous peoples have been saying all along that it’s the way of life that counts. more

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  • Stirring the Pot in the “Stans”

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    The NATO coalition operating in Afghanistan and the US Central Intelligence Agency operating in Pakistan are engaged in a war against a non-governmental organization (al Qaeda) and against non-state warriors (Taliban). Hundreds of combatants are being killed while thousands of civilians are also being killed. The unintended consequence of such mayhem?–growing opposition to NATO and… more

  • Precarious Platforms

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    As Global Voices notes, the crackdown on independent media by the Peruvian government has been mirrored by hackers and swarmers attacking indigenous rights bloggers. A good lesson about backing up files, and not placing one’s trust in precarious corporate platforms like Google, Blogger or YouTube. more

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  • Greenwashing Big Oil

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    The Alberta Tar Sands is the largest and arguably dirtiest, carbon-generating industrial project in human history. So how do the oil companies go about defeating the First Nations and bona fide environmental networks opposed to the project? The answer according to Macdonald Stainsby and Dru Oja Jay, authors of Offsetting Resistance: the effects of foundation… more

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  • Diversity or Death

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    As showcased on the Survival International website, the diversity of humanity is intimately tied to the diversity of nature. Given the contribution to climate change of predatory practices like deforestation for biofuel and open pit mining for luxury goods like oil and diamonds, this loss of diversity has become a death sentence not only for… more

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  • Norton Finally Investigated

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    Gale Norton, former Secretary of the Interior, is finally being investigated for corruption in office. Having built a career helping energy, mining, and timber corporations steal US assets, Norton now faces charges for parleying her finessing of contracts into a lucrative position with Shell. Of note to those following the development of the World Indigenous… more

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  • State Schizophrenia

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    With the rise in consciousness of human rights instruments devised through the UN to redress the profound grievances of indigenous peoples resulting from colonialism, schizophrenic state institutional behavior has become the norm. As an example of this neoliberal psychiatric dysfunction, one would be hard-pressed to find a more illustrative example than the government of New… more

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  • Denuding the Amazon

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    As the Peruvian, Ecuadoran, and Colombian governments practice pro-privatization neoliberalism in pursuit of denuding the Amazon, the support of the United States is crucial in defeating the indigenous peoples defending their collective rights. Recent assurance from the Obama regime to Colombia’s brutal President Uribe, has made it clear that international human rights instruments will be… more

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  • Treating Triumphant

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    Legislation for Extinction Mi’kmaw Associate Professor Dr. Bonita Lawrence of York University discusses the history of the regulation of indigenous civilizations in Canada through the control of native identity. more

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  • A Tenuous Situation

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    One obstacle in the process of being surmounted through indigenous netwar is the notion of the overlay of states comprising governments with legitimacy to decide on behalf of indigenous societies. As will be forcefully presented in the coming UN talks on climate change and elsewhere, they already have their own governments. The imminent escalation of… more

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  • Price of Gas

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    As the government of British Columbia rolls in dough from gas leases on aboriginal territory, pipelines from the questionably legal, highly-toxic wells have started blowing up. Six of them since October. As RCMP snipers and SWAT teams with machine guns run around the countryside harassing local Indians who’ve filed suit against the province, the not-so-little… more

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  • Aboriginal Title

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    Ethics of Eviction Ethnic cleansing of indigenous peoples takes several forms throughout the world. Many removals of these inherent tenants are conducted under the cover of law, through leases and sales that ignore or misrepresent aboriginal title in favor of state dominion; most use police powers of the state to accomplish the evictions, although military… more

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  • The Imperial Model

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    Plan Colombia I’ve posted so many times on Plan Colombia (the imperial model Obama supports in Colombia and plans to implement in Afghanistan as well), that saying anything more is probably redundant. Except for the fact that it is neoliberalism on steroids, meaning that indigenous peoples everywhere should be on guard against pro-corporate death squads… more

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  • People and Power

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    Free Trade or Free People People and Power reports on the conflict between Peruvian President Garcia and the indigenous people of the Amazon. Succumbing to pressure from the US Congress, Garcia has launched attacks against indigenous peoples on behalf of foreign oil and gas companies. As made clear in the newscast, the question for Peru… more

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  • Undermining Sovereignty

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    Arturo Rosales reports on the Obama regime’s efforts to undermine state sovereignty in Latin America. Corollary to this rejuvenated US imperialism are programs like USAID and NED, used to fund attacks on indigenous self-determination under the guise of the War on Drugs and War on Terror. In clear violation of international humanitarian law, and in… more

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  • An Open Question

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    Yukon Kings and caribou join buffalo in spirit world. Anti-depressant use soars. Disappearance of indigenous cultural icons like buffalo, salmon, and caribou isn’t just traumatic to tribal peoples. Ironically,  it is also catastrophic to industrial societies, who through contact with tribal peoples, have developed or rediscovered an environmental consciousness. Restoring what we can of our… more

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  • Paddle to Suquamish 2009

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    Great healing occurs, naturally, out on the water in canoes during a unique journey. For days and weeks hundreds of indigenous paddlers are out on the water. This year, which marks the 20th year of the journey, they arrive on August 3 at the Suquamish for another week of cultural celebrations. The canoe journey is… more

  • Tribalism

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    Tribalism seems to be a hot topic in the blogosphere as of late. As the ongoing conflict between industrial and indigenous societies escalates, it is good to remember who initially attacked whom. Conflict resolution requires acknowledging past wrongs by making amends in the present. Until industrial societies stop attacking tribal peoples, nothing fundamental can be… more

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  • Facing History

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    Modern states built on theft of indigenous homelands all exhibit psychoses due to an inability to face up to and make amends for genocide and ethnic cleansing. Israel is presently the most blatant example, but Canada and the United States are still evading this obligation. Along with Australia and New Zealand, Canada and the US… more

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  • Journey of Man

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    Tribal heritage — including original languages, songs, dance and art — contain within them the stories of the journey of man. More than anything else, they are essential to what it means to be human. Erosion of this identity through diaspora, industrialization and colonization has diminished our collective humanity. The recovery of this heritage in… more

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  • Protecting Traditional Medicine

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    The world is full of a wealth of precious knowledge. That has to be protected by all means. We are all responsible to keep this wonderful knowledge alive and vibrant. With physical, spiritual and social health being searched for all over but oftentimes missing in this world there is more and more interest in and… more

  • Raising a Ruckus

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    Ten years after the Battle in Seattle exposed corrupt UN agencies like the World Trade Organization (WTO), Climate Justice Action has announced its intention to disrupt the December 2009 UN Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen. Attacking climate criminals and the new colonialism, says CJA, requires uniting against the anti-democratic corporate globalization plans for plundering… more

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  • Living with Nature

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    The two oceanic entries to Washington state’s interior are Cape Flattery in the north, and Cape Disappointment in the south. Inside Cape Flattery lies the Salish Sea, including Strait of Juan de Fuca, Strait of Georgia, Hood Canal and Puget Sound. Inside Cape Disappointment lies the Columbia and Snake Rivers. At the time Lewis and… more

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  • Educational Opportunity

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    Overcoming Exclusion Overcoming exclusion in education is the subject of a report by UNICEF and Minority Rights Group International. The report takes a detailed look at how minorities and indigenous peoples are excluded from educational opportunity, and suggests how to surmount this human rights tragedy. more

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  • Wall Street’s Boy

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    While human rights activists like former US Congresswoman Cynthia Mckinney run medical supplies for Gaza past Israeli naval blockades, President Obama continues supplying Israel with billions of dollars  in armaments to use in slaughtering Palestinians. Obama’s refusal to honor the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples makes it clear whose side he’s on.… more

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  • New Dam Projects on Dayak Territory in Borneo

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    It is one of the last intact rainforests of the world. The jungle of Sarawak in the Malay state of Borneo. For years the government engages in dam projects cutting through virgin land and threatening a fragile treasure of plants and rare animals displacing thousands of local indigenous groups such as the Dayak people. These… more

  • Psychic Sacrilege

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    As icons of the American experience, the tribes that defeated the Seventh Cavalry still play a central role in our mythology and psychic evolution. Attacked by the US Army for demanding illegal settlers and other thieves after gold in the Black Hills leave their reservation, the Sioux tribes have fought many battles to survive the… more

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  • Ceding Sovereignty

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    With the new Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff announcing a plan to implement a counterinsurgency in Afghanistan  modeled on that of the plan used by the US military in Colombia, we thought it might bear looking at how well that has worked. To begin our examination of Plan Colombia, we note the… more

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  • Getting Real

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    As dominant society venues for participation in UN climate change talks go virtual, indigenous peoples are getting real. Jay Taber, Rudolph Rÿser and Renee Davis provide historical perspective on the anticipated conflict between indigenous and industrial values at the upcoming UN conference in Copenhagen this December. more

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  • Clash of Values

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    According to indigenous peoples worldwide, surviving climate change requires reliance on the resilience and adaptability of indigenous customary laws, not the exclusionary laws of commerce developed by corporations seeking monopolies. As indigenous peoples confront UN agencies like the World Intellectual Property Organization over the theft of their traditional knowledge and destruction of their intellectual property,… more

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  • Oil Production in the Amazon- Two Models

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    The government of Ecuador with the help of funds from Germany, amongst others, wants to quit oil production in the Amazon agreeing to what can be regarded as a pilot project in the interest of climate and environmental protection. At the same time the Peruvian government permits new oil exploitation by the French- English company,… more

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  • On Its Head

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    The assumption of lineal progress limits our conceptual appreciation of what is the most dynamic aspect of human evolution in the world today. While tribal governing entities have relied on conservation, cooperation, and reciprocity to maintain internal stability for millenia, they have now extended these values into network society. Pan-tribal global solidarity in confronting the… more

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  • Ongoing Protest in Peru

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    Frustration is tangible in many parts of Peru these days. Many citizens are totally ready to fight mismanagement and corruption, demanding to exchange the current government. Demands, however, are fragmented, no common and clear aim is put forward. Complaints are massive, the need that something has to be done cannot be more evident. Hiking through… more

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  • The Andean Revolution

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    The Andean revolution of indigenous peoples against neocolonial violence under the rubrics of Free Trade, the War on Drugs and the Global War on Terror — all US imperial inventions — is anything but spontaneous or reactionary. Rather, it is the result of extensive research, education, and organizing by indigenous peoples to liberate themselves through… more

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  • First Victory in the Amazon

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    The people in the Amazon are celebrating their victory of the day. Almost two weeks after the bloodshed in the peruvian Amazon with the government having entered into discussions with the indigenous peoples of the region at least two contested decrees about the use of forest and agriculture are to be repealed. Internal as well… more

  • Already Failed President

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    Obama’s Human Rights Scorecard: Indigenous Peoples — F LGBT Peoples — F Unions — F War and Peace — F Health Care — F Education — F Govt Corruption — F