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Beautiful Children

Fourth World Eye Blog

Jay Taber

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  • Mainstream Masochism

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    Disheartening as our absence of communal relations is in America, it does help to explain our persistent affection toward institutions, as well as our attachment to their recognition and acknowledgment in validating our self-worth — indeed, in bestowing on us the right to exist. Unhealthy as this institutionalized relationship is for us, both individually and [&hellip... more →

  • A Beautiful Mind

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    If communication in its myriad forms of expression is what comprises a culture, then the particular architecture or design of communicating is what determines that culture’s level of human consciousness. An emphasis on beauty in art, song, dance, and storytelling will produce a very different consciousness than one inclined toward ugliness. It almost seems trite [&hellip... more →

  • Walking Around Ideas

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    The social practice of walkabout by the world’s oldest indigenous culture serves many purposes, one of which is acquiring perspective through the literal travel through time and space at a pace that allows continuous connectivity to one’s environs, dreams, ancestors, and sense of place. Traveling slow for those of us severed from our ancestral roots [&hellip... more →

  • The Body Politic

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    The primary mission of institutions charged with protecting the public health is to contain outbreaks and to prevent epidemics associated with infectious disease. The first order of business in the public health regime is to isolate and study the various pathogens that pose such a threat to society, in order to determine the most effective [&hellip... more →

  • Just Cause

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    The European Court of Justice might soon choose to consider an application by the Cornish Stannary Parliament. Citing discriminatory treatment by England in the Duchy of Cornwall — also known as the nation of Kernow — the Cornish petitioners’ case sounds in part like a British version of Cobell v Norton (the Indian Trust Fund [&hellip... more →

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