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Beautiful Children

Fourth World Eye Blog

Economy

Food Riots, Climate Change, Its the Economy Stupid

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Speaking at the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at the United Nations (23 April 2008) Bolivian President Evo Morales called on indigenous peoples’ delegates to recognize the importance of ancient traditions and knowledge held by Fourth World nations as the essential ingredient for reversing the adverse effects of Climate Change. Morales, according to Climatewire, said [&hellip... more →

Africa’s States Crumble

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Kenya is aflame with internecine tribal warfare. Sudan is split between the Arab controlled government, the Dinka, Fur, Nuba, and Nubian peoples. Rwanda, Uganda, Ethiopia, the Congo, and Chad have been equally faced with violence and warfare. Namibia battles separatist tribes in the northeast, and Zimbabwe’s government promotes division and violence against Zimbabwe’s various peoples. [&hellip... more →

Nations open door to Energy Independence

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Guest Contributor: Laura Killian, CWIS Associate Scholar Obtaining clean energy and working towards independence from fossil fuels has, up until recently, been a far off, expensive notion for small communities. That notion is changing, due in part as renewable energy technology advances while new markets open, allowing for costs to be lowered each year. Fourth [&hellip... more →

Local and accessible

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It is often said that progress is inevitable and that things will always get better as a result of progress. In recent years my own observation, as I am sure that of many millions of others, is that this idea of progress isn’t what it’s cracked up to be. Nothing is actually inevitable, least of [&hellip... more →

Isolated Incidents

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Three recent news items caught my eye this week. One on Canadian mining corporations supporting murderous dictators around the globe, another on Yahoo selling the IDs of four dissident writers to the Chinese government, and a third on India‘s plans to clear indigenous people from the landscape. While none of this is especially surprising or [&hellip... more →

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