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Beautiful Children

Fourth World Eye Blog

FW Geo-Politics

“Mestizo,” vs “Indígena”

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“Don’t touch those tennis shoes!” is the command said directly or otherwise implied. By this command, Fourth World peoples are directed to stay as their ancestors were and not live as modern human beings. This has been the way of the settler descendants to keep indigenous peoples from claiming their powers and rights. Descendants of [&hellip... more →

Internationalizing Indian Rights

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Bolivian president Evo Morales, an Aymaran, spoke before the United Nations General Assembly as a head of state. Before speaking Morales met with Haudenosaunee, Oglala Lakota and Cree leaders at a U.N. Permanent Forum for Indigenous Issues hosted meeting requested by President Morales. The meeting of Bolivia’s president with Fourth World nation leaders in New [&hellip... more →

Walloons and Flemish may go on their own

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The Flemish are not sure they want to be in the same independent country–Belgium–with the Walloons.  After centuries of living together, these two peoples may decide to go on their own. Like the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1993 creating the two separate states of the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic the two main nations [&hellip... more →

What the UN Declaration Means

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It is our observation at the Center that there are from 6,000 to 7,000 nations that speak original languages and generally occupy territories in virtually every continent in the world. The UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (PFII) claims that indigenous peoples come from some 70 countries and have a combined population of some 370 [&hellip... more →

Ungoverned or Ungovernable

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In the 2007 RAND publication Ungoverned Territories: A Unique Front in the War on Terrorism, RAND scholars note, “Since the end of the Cold War, failed or failing states and ungoverned territories within otherwise viable states have become a more common phenomenon. These territories generate all manner of security problems, such as civil conflict and [&hellip... more →

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