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Gordon Pullar

Gordon Pullar
Positions:
  • Founding Advisory Board
  • FWJ Editorial Board - Associate Editor
Affiliation:Aleut, University of AlaskaRegion:Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Country:USA
Interests:anthropology, ethnohistory, Alaska Native politics, cultural revitalization, family history research
Biographical Information:Gordon L. Pullar (Tan’icak) is a Kodiak Island Sugpiaq (Alutiiq) and an associate professor of rural development at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He has served nearly 20 years with the University of Alaska Fairbanks, including 13 years as the Director of the Department of Alaska Native and Rural Development (now Alaska Native Studies and Rural Development). He served ten years as tribal council president of the Tangirnaq Native Village (aka Woody Island) and continues to serve on the council and on the board of directors of the Alutiiq Museum in Kodiak. He is a past president and CEO of the regional Kodiak Area Native Association, and the past chairman of the Koniag Education Foundation.

He has conducted research and published articles on cultural identity, cultural revitalization movements, Alaska Natives and archaeology, repatriation, and other issues related to Native Americans. He co-edited the book, Looking Both Ways: Heritage and Identity of the Alutiiq People (University of Alaska Press 2001). He also authored a chapter in the book, Giinaquq-Like a Face: Sugpiaq Masks of the Kodiak Archipelago, (University of Alaska Press). He has lectured widely on Alaska Native land claims, repatriation issues, and cultural identity throughout the U.S. and in Canada, Denmark, Finland, Greenland, Malaysia, Norway, Russia, and Switzerland.

An anthropologist, he holds a BA from Western Washington University, an MPA from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. from the Union Institute. His doctoral dissertation title was Indigenous culture and organizational culture: A case study of an Alaska Native organization. He is a student of the carving of traditional Sugpiaq masks and researches genealogy in his free time.
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