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  • Posted on via Facebook: Fourth World Journal (FWJ) ISSN: 1090-5251 (Online) Fourth World Journal (FWJ) is a subscription based, peer-reviewed, and refereed international journal published by the Center for World Indigenous Studies, USA. FWJ is published to provide a scholarly venue for international scholars, political, entrepreneurial and cultural leaders, and activists. FWJ aims to encourage studies, commentaries, and analysis of the ideas, knowledge, and situation of the worlds more than 5000 Fourth World nations and the more than 1.3 billion people these nations represent. We have been publishing since 1984 as a reliable, trusted, and respected source of contemporary Fourth World scholarship and commentaries from around the world. The journal publishes research papers in the fields of traditional healing arts and sciences, fourth world geopolitics, traditional knowledge and ancient knowledge systems, humanities and social science such as anthropology, business studies, communication studies, cross-cultural studies, demography, indigenous environmental sciences, food sovereignty, development studies, governance, economics, education, ethics, geography, history, information science, international relations, indigenous legal systems and law, linguistics, library science, media studies, methodology, philosophy, political science, population studies, psychology, public administration, sociology, social welfare, linguistics, literature, paralegal, performing arts (music, theatre & dance), religious studies, visual arts, and women studies. The FWJ is published in ONLINE. The FWJ is indexed with and included in EBSCO (Ipswich, MA, USA), Gale (Farmington Hills, MI, USA) and INFORMIT (University – Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia). In addition FWJ is considering the indexing process with ISI, ERIC, Econlit, Scopus and Journalseek. FWJ publishes twice a year. We publish original papers, review papers, commentaries, conceptual framework, analytical and simulation models, case studies, empirical research, technical notes, and book reviews. The Editors of FWJ invite papers for Vol. 15 No. 2 - now scheduled to be published on 22 January 2017. Last date of submission: December 1, 2016 for Peer Review and December 28, 2016 for General Submissions. However, an early submission will get preference in case of Peer Review and publication process. Manuscript Requirements are available online at: http://cwis.org/FWJ/submission_policy.php Please read these requirements carefully. We are particularly interested that you follow APA6 style guidelines for references and citations. Please submit images, tables, and charts as separate files with your manuscript (compress all files to gather if necessary). Images must be 800 pixels across at minimum to ensure accurate reproduction. Send your manuscript to the Managing Editor at Heidi@cwis.org For more information, visit the official FWJ website by logging on to: http://cwis.org/FWJ/ Thank you, Dr. Rudolph C. Ryser The Editor in Chief, Fourth World Journal Contact: chair@cwis.org Thank you, Center for World Indigenous Studies
  • Posted on via Twitter: George Manuel--Leader Model Now - https://t.co/UA02yF6LR0
  • Posted on via Twitter: Alliance vs Tar Sands https://t.co/Je1fckB8RI
  • Posted on via Facebook: The Yezidi Nation was in 2014 attacked by the ISOL non-state in Syria and Iraq resulting in massive killings. The CWIS has followed events since and wish now to note that the International Criminal Court remains a slim option for the Yezidi Nation to obtain justice. Read here: https://www.freeyezidi.org/blog/2015/09/02/former-icc-prosecutor-recognizes-yezidi-genocide/
  • Posted on via Facebook: There are more than 48.5 million men, women and children according the Mederoo Foundation (Australia, UK and India) Global Slavery Index published in 2016. Twenty eight million of those now enslaved are located in India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Uzbekistan. At the Center for World Indigenous Studies we estimate that fully 80% (38.8 Million) of these people are indigenous peoples--the most vulnerable populations to slavery in the world. The Global Slavery Index measured populations in 167 countries and found four broad areas of vulnerability: populations and groups lacking civil and political protection, social health and economic rights, personal security and populations affected as refugee populations and violent conflicts. There is one more domain where enforced slavery occurs affecting indigenous peoples and other populations: Prisons...particularly commercialized, for-profit prisons. The United States of America imprisons its citizens at the highest rate of any country in the world at 698 per 100,000 citizens (more than 2.164 million people). To emphasize their slavery status, 20,000 and more prisoners have gone on strike from working and some are refusing to eat to protest their slavery status. Read here: https://theintercept.com/2016/09/16/the-largest-prison-strike-in-u-s-history-enters-its-second-week/The Largest Prison Strike in U.S. History Enters Its Second Week
  • Posted on via Twitter: Freedom Train https://t.co/a9cFXHXZ3E
  • Posted on via Twitter: Westphalia to Manhattan https://t.co/siTBrWztqv
  • Posted on via Facebook: Intercontinental Cry Magazine needs the voluntary support and help of a funding developer. This is an urgent appeal for support and help to ensure that this important publication can survive since it must rely solely on individual and group contributions now. Read on: https://intercontinentalcry.org/ic-magazine-call-applications-development-fundraising-coordinator/IC Magazine Call for Applications: Development & Fundraising Coordinator
  • Posted on via Facebook: American Indian nations throughout the hemisphere and peoples around the world have been facing the adverse effects of human induced climate changes for decades; and accordingly these nations have needed to adapt on a continuing basis. Aljazeera's Emily Crane Linn calls important attention to efforts by Indigenous Scientists and Conventional Scientists to blend their knowledge systems to deal with the needs of Indian nations to adapt to climate changes. (See: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2016/07/tribes-work-scientists-climate-change-160713092436522.html) The problem now for many indigenous nations is that they are experiencing the "Kiribati Effect:" Kiribati is an island nation that is slowly being inundated by a the rising ocean and its people have no place to go or adapt to. Indigenous nations in many places around the world face the same fate whether it is forest fires, floods, colder winters and hotter summers, animals moving to other localities and more. Already indigenous nations experience such pressures from changing climate that their people have become climate refugees--their forced presence now giving rise to new conflicts in neighboring regions. As this article suggests, much more will be required for all humans to respond to this sustained human created disaster. The economic, political and environmental policies countries and their subordinate governments operate under are no longer sustainable. Large cities are not sustainable since they draw dramatic quantities of natural resources from the land and then produce huge amounts of waste. Large cities must disaggregate intentionally or they will be forced by the changing climate to collapse. Indigenous nations like those in Oklahoma must look well beyond the current political, economic and environmental frameworks created by countries like the United States, Canada, Mexico and those in Europe, Africa, Asia and elsewhere. The reliance on the system of "development" consumes resources and produces waste well beyond the capacity of nature to restore itself. Intentional development must now be sharply curtailed; and even when that is accomplished we are faced with degraded environments and the quality of life on this planet for generations to come. Indigenous knowledge systems may be helpful in the long term, but forty years ago would have been a good time to begin applying what indigenous knowledge systems have had to offer from thousands of years of experience. It is probably fair to say that so called modern science and indigenous sciences have proven enormously valuable, but if the people who make decisions in government, business, academia, and religions fail to heed factual evidence produced by these systems of knowledge, then the breakdowns of past civilizations are likely to be repeated by the present civilization. At the Center for World Indigenous Studies (cwis.org) we still have confidence, that for the long term, indigenous knowledge systems will become the basis for human continuity.US tribes work with scientists against climate change
  • Posted on via Twitter: Uyghur Visiting Scholars At CWIS https://t.co/XLJjiS3zPF
  • Posted on via Twitter: Killing Cockroaches with a Hammer - https://t.co/iUvMpj4zQH
  • Posted on via Twitter: Silencing Dissent https://t.co/zcgRl1LncJ
  • Posted on via Twitter: White Nationalism https://t.co/auArD0NvRV
  • Posted on via Twitter: Obama's Death Squads https://t.co/4I1lrVPov9
  • Posted on via Twitter: Multicultural Counseling Workbook 2 https://t.co/RzCNUPGvI3